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  • Now reading the 1775/6 sections of Ezra Styles, Literary Diary, Vol. I. Highly enjoyable. Its a facsimile copy. If only the print weren't so small.

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    • Grant Moves South By Bruce Catton.
      "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

      Homer


      BoRG

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      • American Spartans: A combat History of the U.S. Marine Corps
        and i am re-reading Once an Eagle and The Art of War, I've read both a few times for the USMC professional reading list.
        Last edited by IronMan15; 21 Nov 09, 16:11.
        "The first time those bastards encounter US Marines, I want it to be the most traumatic experience of their miserable lives."
        -Gen. James Mattis, USMC

        Psalms 144.1

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        • Lancaster, by Leo Mckinstry. A good read, would recommend it. Does anybody know of a similar book on the B-17 they would recommend?

          HONNEUR ET FIDÉLITÉ

          "Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won." - Duke of Wellington at Waterloo.

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          • The Five Rings...
            In Vino Veritas

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            • David Syrett, The Royal Navy in American Waters, 1775-1783.

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              • 'River God' - Wilbur Smith. Fiction set in Ancient Egypt. So far, so good. A good writer. The story is interesting.

                I first read one of his books a few months back. 'Cry Wolf'. An "adventure" set in Ethiopia around the Italian invasion, pre-WW2. The story read so well, with extremely likable characters, fast paced plot and excellent writing, I had to check out some of his other work.

                'River God' seemed like the next best choice as I did not care to read some of his other works about a South African family's dynasty.
                Life is precious, but also cheap. For without war, there is no peace. GS ~ A Soldier's Ghost. A Warrior's Soul.

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                • William R. Trotter's The Winter War: The Russo-Finnish War of 1939-40.

                  A great book on one of the most fascinating wars of the 20th Century. If anyone wants to know about the conflict I would recommend it with this:

                  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Winter-War-S...9012827&sr=8-3

                  A close second.

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                  • Originally posted by Mackie View Post
                    William R. Trotter's The Winter War: The Russo-Finnish War of 1939-40.

                    A great book on one of the most fascinating wars of the 20th Century. If anyone wants to know about the conflict I would recommend it with this:

                    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Winter-War-S...9012827&sr=8-3

                    A close second.
                    I have Trotter's book and have read at least 3 times. Always find something I missed before. It is an excellent book.
                    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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                    • Originally posted by Dogsbody67 View Post
                      Lancaster, by Leo Mckinstry. A good read, would recommend it. Does anybody know of a similar book on the B-17 they would recommend?

                      Flying Forts: The B-17 in World War II (1968) by Martin Caidin; great book.
                      Give me a fast ship and the wind at my back for I intend to sail in harms way! (John Paul Jones)

                      Initiated Chief Petty Officer
                      Hard core! Old School! Deal with it!

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                      • Originally posted by bass_man86 View Post
                        Flying Forts: The B-17 in World War II (1968) by Martin Caidin; great book.
                        Cheers!
                        HONNEUR ET FIDÉLITÉ

                        "Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won." - Duke of Wellington at Waterloo.

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                        • Well, it's kind of got a military theme. There's some kind of insurection going on - inbetween the sex.
                          I like Heinlein. He, Asimov, and Card are the reason the genre should be called speculative fiction - rather than science fiction. They focus on social, cultural, and political speculation. Gadgets are just a good backdrop.

                          Last edited by Duncan; 24 Nov 09, 17:43.
                          AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
                          The Blitz - Play by Email computer wargaming.

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                          • Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
                            I have Trotter's book and have read at least 3 times. Always find something I missed before. It is an excellent book.
                            It's definitely a book I am going to read over and over. I just finished the chapter on the Kollaa defence, it's simply incredible how the Finnish managed to hold off against such odds.

                            I bet there's quite a lot of great books on the Winter War in Finland, if only they could be translated into English. The one I linked to earlier was written in the 1970s so didn't have access to some information that was later released; but it does have a lot of great stories from the Finnish side. I have only read snippets of it so far.

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                            • Now dipping into Ferling's Almost a Miracle - the section on Bunker Hill.

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                              • Have also just started reading A Charge of Mutiny. The Court-Martial of Lieutenant Colonel George Johnston for deposing Governor William Bligh in the Rebellion of 26 January 1808, later known as 'The Rum Rebellion.
                                Johnston was on Bunker Hill apparently, aged 10, where his father was wounded. He joined the Royal Marines in March 1776 and served in New York and Halifax in 1777 and 1778. He came out to NSW in the First Fleet. Eventually he played a major part in suppressing the convict rebellion at Vinegar Hill in 1804 and led the rebellion against Governor Bligh in 1808.

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