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  • Viking: Odinn's Child. by Tim Severin. First published 2005. First of a trilogy that includes Viking: Sworn Brother and Viking: King Man's. Re-reading this historical novel and plan to then read the other two again. The stories follow the entire life of a Norseman who travels throughout the Viking World in the 11th century. As I remember, this novel was the best, especially as it had him in Iceland and Greenland in his childhood.

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    • Taking a break from history for a while.

      Shadow of a Dark Queen by Raymond E. Fiest.

      Not as good as Magician but okay. His stories do seem somewhat repetitive though.
      "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

      Homer


      BoRG

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      • The Power of Patriotism: The Speech Heard Around the World


        The Power of Patriotism: The Speech Heard Around the World



        This nationally-acclaimed book won the George Washington Honor Medal from the Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge.

        The Power of Patriotism represents an enormous love of God and country. It is a story of how a simple speech left the hands and lips of an average American citizen and touched the hearts of a nation starving for a way to express their thoughts and feelings of patriotism. This is the speech that fed that hunger and encouraged a nation to express their thoughts and feelings and empowered a world to embrace them. This is The Power of Patriotism Ė The Speech Heard Around the World.

        In February 2003 at the outset of the War with Iraq, Beth Chapman presented a four-minute speech at a "Stand Up for America Rally" for which she received five standing ovations from the 1,200 people in attendance.

        "The Speech," as it has become known, immediately began circulating throughout newspapers, television and radio stations all across America and worldwide via the Internet. The speech drew international acclaim reaching all 50 states and more than 18 countries, the Pentagon, aircraft carriers, battlefields, victims of 9-11, veteranís organizations and all branches of the U.S. Military. It was entered into the Congressional Record, just weeks after it was written and presented, and is hailed by many as "One of the greatest speeches ever written."

        Chapman received thousands of letters, phone calls and emails in praise of the speech that most termed as, "What I felt and thought, but didnít know how to say."

        This book reflects upon the origination, presentation, results, heart-breaking and heart-touching responses received from veterans, military family members and American soldiers who used the speech to motivate their troops the first day they marched on Baghdad and the first day their submarine fired missiles from the Red Sea.

        Read this book and experience The Power of Patriotism!
        17thAirborneSon

        "The horizon is unlimited." Major General Matthew Ridgeway

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        • The Man on Mao's Right: From Harvard Yard to Tiananmen Square, My Life Inside China's Foreign Ministry by Ji Chaozhu.

          Fascinating insiders view.
          I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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          • Currently working my way through Richard M. Ketchum's Decisive Day. The Battle for Bunker Hill. Having read more recent works on Bunker Hill, eg Elting, Fleming, it perturbs me a bit as he seems to swallow some of the mythology a little too uncritcally. Still, its an easy read.
            Have also just started Edward Barrington De Fonblanque's Political And Military Episodes In The Latter Half Of The Eighteenth Century Derived From The Life And Correspondence of John Burgoyne, General, Statesman, Dramatist. Published originally in 1876. (I have a facsimile copy - the original would probably be worth thousands.) Only a few pages into it, but its fascinating.

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            • I just started in on Victor Klemperer's diary from January 1933 to December 1941.

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              • 'Pork Chop Hill' by SLA Marshall.

                Just started it & I'm only into the 2nd chapter. Some grim, Korean War trench fighting in near-barren hill country agaisnt multitudes of resolute ChiCom soldiers.
                Life is precious, but also cheap. For without war, there is no peace. GS ~ A Soldier's Ghost. A Warrior's Soul.

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                • Originally posted by GhostSoldier View Post
                  'Pork Chop Hill' by SLA Marshall.

                  Just started it & I'm only into the 2nd chapter. Some grim, Korean War trench fighting in near-barren hill country agaisnt multitudes of resolute ChiCom soldiers.
                  Thats a good one.

                  The movie is really good also. Pretty realistic for when it was made.

                  "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

                  Homer


                  BoRG

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                  • Strangely, I haven't seen the movie before but would like to. It's based on the book.
                    Life is precious, but also cheap. For without war, there is no peace. GS ~ A Soldier's Ghost. A Warrior's Soul.

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                    • It's one of my favorite war movies. I highly recommend it.
                      "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

                      Homer


                      BoRG

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                      • 'Haig: A Re-appraisal Eighty Years On' (ed. Brian Bond & Nigel Cave)

                        I'm looking forward to reading this one and seeing just how the contributors bust the myths surrounding this much maligned commander.
                        Signing out.

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                        • I am reading The Red and the Black by Stendahl

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                          • Back to history:

                            Glory Road by Bruce Catton. I had never read any of his stuff till a couple weeks ago. Now I can't stop. Very good!
                            "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

                            Homer


                            BoRG

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                            • Now reading the diary of Lt. John Barker, The British in Boston for the third time. A fascinating picture of day to day life in Boston, 1774-1776 from the point of view of a British Lieutenant.

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                              • History of warfare by John Keegan. It's one of the best I've ever read

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