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  • Originally posted by Lance Williams
    I have yet to read Sharpe's Escape , how was it?
    Typical Sharpe:

    -Performs bravely at a crucial point in a battle, and wins it.
    -Is rewared for this by losing commmand of his company.
    -Discovers and spoils the secret French plan to win the war.
    -Saves the damsel in distress.
    -Fights and wins another battle against overwhelming odds.
    -Is retored to glory and honour.

    Cornwell is going back and filling in the gaps form the original series. This one is set in Portugal in 1810-11.
    What God abandoned, these defended,
    And saved the sum of things for pay.

    A.E. Housman
    [ 1859-1936 ]

    Comment


    • Originally posted by DANJANOU
      Typical Sharpe:

      -Performs bravely at a crucial point in a battle, and wins it.
      -Is rewared for this by losing commmand of his company.
      -Discovers and spoils the secret French plan to win the war.
      -Saves the damsel in distress.
      -Fights and wins another battle against overwhelming odds.
      -Is retored to glory and honour.

      Cornwell is going back and filling in the gaps form the original series. This one is set in Portugal in 1810-11.
      Thanks!
      Lance W.

      Peace through superior firepower.

      Comment


      • I've been reading "Gettysburg's Bloody Wheatfield" by Jay Jorgenson and "Caspian Sea of Ink" by Richard Sauers.
        I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

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        • Brought along Blood, Tears, and Folly by Len Dieghton on our recent trip to Lake Shasta, CA. Have read it before a long time ago and figured I'd give another go. Always a good read and raises some good questions.
          If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by dannybou
            Reading Russia at War from Alexander Werth.
            Any good??? What is the isbn number? I would like very much to read more from the russian point of view.

            All my books on the Eastern front, are mostly from the German point of view, or books like anthony Beevor's Stalingrad, that, was the first book that had some Russian perspective in it.

            Ofcourse the brutal truth, that during the city fighting pow's were executed after questioning, by both sides, but I noticed that some Russian members here have said that Beevor's book isnt so good.

            I thought it was, exactly for the reason that he gave a russian point of view too.

            ahem, sorry for the rant, for I was just about to start The Road To Stalingrad, by: John Erickson.

            A book definately from the German viewpoint.

            I finished 'Task force Dagger', an easy read book about the role of the Green Beret's during the Afganistan 2001 war, and some info on the SAS and their Aussie counterparts there too.

            Very fluid reading, and make's it seem almost too easy. I think it could have been a bit more gritty, things were glossed up, but I understand, as it was written very much with the twin towers still in the minds of people.

            Any suggestions on a good book about the whole Afganistan, and especially Iraq cituation, I have a Tom Clancy-Gen Franks collaboration about op Iraqi freedom in my shelf that I havent go to, somehow, though, the thing that Clancy, who wrote quite interesting fact books about the different service branches of the US Military forces, that were good on reading about the different equipment that was faithfully described in each book (I have read 'fighter wing-a guided tour', and 'Armoured cav-a guided tour'.
            They are good for the facts on the kit that these groups use, the airforce one espcecailly blows your mind when you think what their ordnance's distructive power is nowadays!

            Also, as Beevor was mentioned, His Crete is in my shelf, and if it's as good as Stalingrad, and the Spanish Civil war were (Didnt really like Berlin 45 for some reason, perhaps because I read it as a translation)...


            Anyway, so any comment's on the book, Dannyboy??? Another game???

            Drop a line here or pm me anytime mate!

            Mr Poundr.

            p.s.
            freightshaker, what is 'blood sweat and folly' about?

            I have read Deighton's, 'fighter' (so, so), 'Bomber' (Exellent), SS London (Interesting consept), and I have in my shelf 'Blizkrieg' that I havent got to read yet, but the name make's it quite clear what it's about!
            I wonder what the one you are reading is about, and if it's good, Deighton at his best is a great read!

            Mr Poundr.
            Last edited by 17poundr; 09 Jun 05, 17:43.
            "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

            If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

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            • Originally posted by 17poundr
              ahem, sorry for the rant, for I was just about to start The Road To Stalingrad, by: John Erickson.

              A book definately from the German viewpoint.
              Road to Stalingrad (and to Berlin) is definatly written from Soviet perspective.
              I know I should put a witty signature here but I just can't be bothered to.....

              Comment


              • Any comments on 'The Myth of the Great War' by John Mosier? (WWI)

                Or 'A Peace to End All Peace' by David Fromkin? (Ottoman Empire goes under).

                Thinking they'd be next, or I'll go for more war porno like 'Luftwaffe Aces' by Kurowski. Never a bad read Kurowski, and lovely airplanes and brave men, could not possibly fail.
                "You can't change the rules in the middle of the game."
                "Hey, you just made that rule up."


                Heil Dicke Bertha!

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Dicke Bertha
                  Any comments on 'The Myth of the Great War' by John Mosier? (WWI)

                  Or 'A Peace to End All Peace' by David Fromkin? (Ottoman Empire goes under).

                  Thinking they'd be next, or I'll go for more war porno like 'Luftwaffe Aces' by Kurowski. Never a bad read Kurowski, and lovely airplanes and brave men, could not possibly fail.
                  I have of the first one but never read it. Is it any good?
                  http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

                  Comment


                  • Yes, very interesting. Several WW1 books I have read are merely a chronological account on a rather large scale. This one reads more like a TOAW AAR, and has some number and consequence analysis of strategy/operations/tactics. I understand it is controversional somewhat, and any input on facts would be interesting. I'd like to read it really thoroughly though, and possibly rereading The Pity of War, by Niall Ferguson parallel to compare technicalities.
                    "You can't change the rules in the middle of the game."
                    "Hey, you just made that rule up."


                    Heil Dicke Bertha!

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by aktarian
                      Road to Stalingrad (and to Berlin) is definatly written from Soviet perspective.
                      Glad to know that! For I have read a fiew books about the russian front that are from the German view point, and considering, that half of the Russo-German war, was succesful Soviet op's,(And even during the 'German summers 41%42 there was great Soviet defencive combat sometimes forgotten in many books)...

                      I would like to read about Red Army tactics, operations leaders, troop remembrances ect...

                      And having read books like Panzer ace's, (the rememberances of six top german panzer ace's, all but Vittman and Dr Bäcke, were fully in the eastern front), and Guderians autobiography, KURSK by Robin Cross, and Stalingrad with Berlin 45, from the good and solid writer (IMHO), Anthony Beevor. (Still got his new Krete book to look forward to!

                      Glad to hear I have a good read from the Russian point of view in front of me! Ericson has been in a couple of documentaries I have seen and seem's to know his business.

                      By the way, I ordered from amazon.com, a book on Iraq, the operation 'Iraqi freedom, and Telic' phases, and the following, terrorist war, by the legendary John Keegan!

                      I think that book will be a good read for shure!

                      His ww1 book is very well written indeed, I fully recommend it for anybody wanting a book that covers the whole war, whitout leaving much out, or getting into too much of 'mini stories', as some books about one battle have to do.

                      Also I got as a gift (All these books to read and so little time)! A very interesting looking book called:
                      AIR POWER by: Stephen Budiansky.

                      I quote from the back cover: 'Drawing on combat memoirs, govenment archives and museum collections, Budiansky tells the story of war in the air in the first one hudred years of flight... Air power is the definite exploration of war in the modern age'... Sounds good huh?

                      p.s. för min swenska komppis, Mr Bertha, 'The myth of the great war' is a must, if you really want to get into alternative, but well researched and compact history of ww1, then this is your book.

                      His conclusions, are so logical you cant fight them, and they simultaneously explains why ww1 was the slogging match it was, and give's good insight onto the various combat tactics that the different combatants used differently.

                      And yet, I have to agree with the books rewiev, his conclusion about the end of the war, continue his otherwize clear and intelligent themes too far, and are misguiding, but all in all a great book. get it!
                      Last edited by 17poundr; 13 Jun 05, 11:08.
                      "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

                      If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

                      Comment


                      • I am currently reading "The Hundred Days" by Patrick O'Brian. It is book 20 out of 21 in the Master and Commander series.
                        There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full. -Henry Kissinger

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Napoleon
                          I am currently reading "The Hundred Days" by Patrick O'Brian. It is book 20 out of 21 in the Master and Commander series.
                          I just got 'Blood rimmed tide' from Astor, about the Ardennes offencive, and also I got a Marshall's campaign book from Osprey.
                          "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

                          If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

                          Comment


                          • Recommendation

                            I have to make the recommendations here for

                            "Rogue Regime" ........brand new......talks about Kim Jong Il and how N Korea is today and has been for the past few decades.

                            "Onward Muslim Soldier" 'How Jihad Still Threatens America and the West'.......by Robert Spencer.

                            These two books will really make you think.

                            Mark
                            Deo Vindice
                            Si vis pacem, para bellum. (If you want peace, prepare for war.)

                            Comment


                            • I'm reading By the Sword by Richard Cohen. It's a selected history of fencing. The reason I mention it here is because it has quite an extensive section devoted to the effect fascism had on fencing. It also has a shorter section on how the uprising in Hungary effected Hungary's dominance in saber and the emigration of Hungarian fencing coaches.

                              Comment


                              • Just finished Leave No Man Behind: liberation and capture missions by David Isby. Good read.
                                As lord and master of your grill, you will welcome any opportunity to display your grilling prowess.
                                Mario Batali, 2006

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