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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Always glad to hear officers reading and using military history. I found reading military history that rhymed with my situations gave me a wider repertoire of options for decisions and courses of action.

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  • Tsar
    replied
    The Murrow boys
    Pioneers on the front lines of broadcast journalism.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    However, I ordered and received via Amazon 27 Articles written by Lawrence, as guidance to British officers dealing with Arabs. Starting to read it this weekend.
    Working in the region I find "27 Articles" still relevant

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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    Picked up Harris' "Munich" as an audiobook for my road travels.

    Started reading Michael Korda's "Hero, the Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia"...A quite interesting read, very well researched and the author brings in the nuances from other authors that wrote bio's about TE Lawrence.

    Figured I wanted to read a bio of Lawrence of Arabia before reading his "Seven Pillars of Wisdom."
    Well I finished reading Korda's bio on Lawrence of Arabia. I highly recommend the 700-page book to anyone interested about TE Lawrence. Quite well researched.

    I was aware that he join the RAF after WW1 to find refuge from the public spotlight. What I did not know is that he first joined as Pte Ross before being invited out...Later joined the Royal Tank Corps as Pte Shaw before transferring to the RAF again, where he became a sea-rescue specialist. After completing his service with the RAF (Feb 1935) he would die several months later in a tragic motorcycle accident (May 1935.)

    The book has a few dry spots, as the author speaks in great length about the self-imposed challenges by Lawrence as he wrote and continually edited the Seven Pillars of Wisdom...Not only what he wrote, but also typeset, format, cover pages, etc ... To a point that I am not interested in reading Seven Pillars anymore!

    However, I ordered and received via Amazon 27 Articles written by Lawrence, as guidance to British officers dealing with Arabs. Starting to read it this weekend.

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  • Mountain Man
    replied
    German Armored Trains 1904 - 1945.

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  • CarpeDiem
    replied
    The newest Journal of Military History

    Among the articles:
    How Wars End:Victorian Colonial Conflicts
    Mapping the First World War: The Empowering Development of Mapmaking during the First World War in the British Army (some great illustrations with this article)
    Technology, "Machine Age" Warfare and the Military Use of Dogs 1880-1918
    The Yugoslav Partisans' Lost Victories: Operations in Montenegro and Bosnia-Herzegovina 1944-1945
    Rommel Almighty? Italian Assessments of the "Desert Fox" during and After the Second World War (gives another view on Rommel not often considered in the English literature)

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  • 101combatvet
    replied
    Close to Black History month so I started The Bondwoman's Narrative.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Glad to read this.
    You have a way with words as well Rick.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Into Robert Harris's third book of his Cicero trilogy, he continues to write clean, clear narrative with fresh analogies and metaphors. His trilogy stands with Graves's two books on Claudius. While Graves has a poetic command of the language and understanding of Roman history, Harris has keen insights to the political machinations of Romans. I lose sleep over Harris's compelling storytelling.

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  • VancePolk
    replied
    Just opened "The Wehrmacht's Last Stand- The German Campaigns of 1944-1945" by Robert Citino.

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  • VancePolk
    replied
    Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
    Currently listening to (I still read, but I use Audible when I'm walking) "A World Undone" by G.J. Meyer. It is about WWI. I am enjoying it. He covers all the theaters, but not in tedious detail. I especially like his "Background" chapters where he covers topics like Lawrence of Arabia.

    Read this one a few years back, really enjoyed it. The "background" chapters are very interesting.

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  • warmoviebuff
    replied
    Currently listening to (I still read, but I use Audible when I'm walking) "A World Undone" by G.J. Meyer. It is about WWI. I am enjoying it. He covers all the theaters, but not in tedious detail. I especially like his "Background" chapters where he covers topics like Lawrence of Arabia.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarpeDiem
    replied


    Found at a second hand bookstore. Good coverage of Fubuki, Navigatori, Fantasque, Porter and Somers, Tribal, and Narvik classes of destroyers built/designed by Japan, Italy, France, US, UK and Germany between the wars.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    deja-vu

    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    For me reading Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars' was like riding across a desert on a camel--many parts became monotonous, but in Book III, Chapter 33, he explains his epiphany during a delirious illness for his concept to defeat the Turks. Brilliant--that chapter alone was worth the long ride.
    You haven't seen reason to change your old preferences, have you Rick
    Nor have I, fully agree.

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    For me reading Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars' was like riding across a desert on a camel--many parts became monotonous, but in Book III, Chapter 33, he explains his epiphany during a delirious illness for his concept to defeat the Turks. Brilliant--that chapter alone was worth the long ride.

    Leave a comment:

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