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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Just finished "Backs to the Wall".

    The book is about what happens after the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759, which is the battle that decided the fate of New France, which becomes a British colony. Quebec City falls into the hands of the British as a result of that battle.

    Well, the book provides info about what happens next, included the French almost recapturing Quebec City a year later at the Battle of Sainte-Foy and the following British campaign to end the French colony in Canada.

    Quite interesting read about early military forces in North America, and where the Amerindians stood during the French-British fight over Canada. Very informative and well researched.

    A map of the Battle of Sainte-Foy may have been useful to better guide the reader, but that would be my only negative critic of the book.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Capt AFB; 07 Apr 18, 10:03.

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  • Tuebor
    replied
    Currently re-reading Nuremberg Raid by Martin Middlebrook (a favorite author). He has such a nice smooth, but choked fully of information style.



    Tuebor

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  • Elers
    replied
    I am currently reading 3 books.

    Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization by Nicholson Baker
    I found it at the Dollar Store. It is done in little vignettes so that you can pick it up, read a little, then put it down for a while. I am of the way through it. So far I find it sobering but interesting. It will probably take me all year to get through it, a few pages at a time.

    The Faithful Spy by Alex Berenson: Good fun read. through it and enjoying it much!

    The third one is Aethelstan: The First King of England by Sarah Foot. I have just started it and it is slow going. It is from the library. I can renew 6 times, which means that I can have it for 14 weeks if no-one else reserves it. It will probably take every bit of that time.

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  • Chukka
    replied
    Around 3 months ago I was browsing a bookshop sci-fi section and bought a book on impulse called Ready Player One. At that stage I didn't realise it was going to be a movie.

    Anyhow, this book is the worst pile of trash I have read. Boring, stunted, juvenile rubbish. I like computer games and sci fi, but this novel is literally just an account of someone playing a computer game. I haven't finished it, go about 40 pages in , and tried another 20 pages last week. It didn't improve, and I looked up the ending on Wikipedia so I didn't have to wade through the rest of this rubbish.

    The bit that bugs me is that it really is just teen fiction, marketed to adults. This is Ernest clines first novel, but he did scriptwrite a film called Fanboys, that I quite liked, about 4 uber nerdy Star Wars fans in the lead up to the release of the phantom menace. Fanboys was fun, this is not.

    And not only that, but it is SOCIALIST! The villains are trying to actually make money from a product people want. Woooo, scary. While the hero wants to take possession something someone else has built, without putting any work into it himself, the leftist dream.


    If you are thinking about this book, just save your $18 and read the subtitles on a YouTube World of Warcraft walk through.
    Last edited by Chukka; 03 Apr 18, 07:09.

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  • Chukka
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    There are a number of books written about the SAS involvement in Gulf War I, and, at least,three books about Bravo Two Zero. (IIRC, the books are: Bravo Two Zero, The One That Got Away, The Real Story Behind Bravo Two Zero.)

    SAS patrols pretty much plan for their own mission, including how they want to be inserted (depending on available assets) and travel method once on the ground.

    The decision to walk to their target area was the patrol's decision, unlike other patrols, which decided to use Pink Panther jeeps or other vehicle to move around once on the ground...I recall the SAS leadership questionning the patrol about not using a vehicle (they were available) but McNab and his patrol made a case for not needing one...So blaming the brass for bad planning here does not stand.

    As for warmer clothing, again, its a decision by the patrol members what to carry...It is not like SAS members are raw recruits going on their first patrol...And if I recall correctly, they lost their Bergen bags after dropping them during a heavy contact with the Iraqi Army, which may explain why nobody had a extra layer of clothes or sleeping bag when they were escaping Westward towards Syria.
    Close Quarter Battle by Mike Curtis is an interesting read, Curtis was a coal miner who joined the Paras just in time for the Falklands and went through Goose Green. He joined the SAS afterwards and had a pretty successful time in Iraq. Everything was planned out and flexible, especially in terms of clothing and how they used their vehicles. They had dramas with driving at first few nights, so they decided to drive by day. Everyone had their say, with the officer having final veto. Also, with everyone being caught out with poor clothing, one of the QM's bought a few dozen overcoats from a Saudi market, and they were in the field within days.

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  • jeffdoorgunnr
    replied
    reading "Truman"............last of the honest presidents..............

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  • Poor Old Spike
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    ..SAS patrols pretty much plan for their own mission..So blaming the brass for bad planning here does not stand..
    Yes, the patrol members have to share most of the blame, personally I'd have refused pointblank to go.
    In fact I read somewhere that one SAS lieutenant(?) did just that, refusing to go on a mission that he didn't agree with, I can't remember if it was the Bravo Two Zero job or another one.
    The writer said something like- "As we embarked without him, we saw him sitting in the HQ office sipping tea".
    Full credit to him..

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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Originally posted by Poor Old Spike View Post
    I'm reading it again and every time I read it I sit open-mouthed at the sheer bad planning by the brass, as inserting an 8-man SAS patrol by Chinook into the middle of Iraq on foot was never going to work.
    1 escaped, 4 were captured and 1 was killed
    2 others died of hypothermia because nobody thought to issue the squad with sleeping bags or even survival blankets..duh..
    There are a number of books written about the SAS involvement in Gulf War I, and, at least,three books about Bravo Two Zero. (IIRC, the books are: Bravo Two Zero, The One That Got Away, The Real Story Behind Bravo Two Zero.)

    SAS patrols pretty much plan for their own mission, including how they want to be inserted (depending on available assets) and travel method once on the ground.

    The decision to walk to their target area was the patrol's decision, unlike other patrols, which decided to use Pink Panther jeeps or other vehicle to move around once on the ground...I recall the SAS leadership questionning the patrol about not using a vehicle (they were available) but McNab and his patrol made a case for not needing one...So blaming the brass for bad planning here does not stand.

    As for warmer clothing, again, its a decision by the patrol members what to carry...It is not like SAS members are raw recruits going on their first patrol...And if I recall correctly, they lost their Bergen bags after dropping them during a heavy contact with the Iraqi Army, which may explain why nobody had a extra layer of clothes or sleeping bag when they were escaping Westward towards Syria.
    Last edited by Capt AFB; 02 Apr 18, 09:10.

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  • Poor Old Spike
    replied
    Bravo Two Zero by Andy McNab

    I'm reading it again and every time I read it I sit open-mouthed at the sheer bad planning by the brass, as inserting an 8-man SAS patrol by Chinook into the middle of Iraq on foot was never going to work.
    1 escaped, 4 were captured and 1 was killed
    2 others died of hypothermia because nobody thought to issue the squad with sleeping bags or even survival blankets..duh..

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by Legate View Post
    Sherman had a different view of glory

    Its glory is all moonshine. Even success, the most brilliant is over dead and mangled bodies [] It is only those who have not heard a shot, nor heard the shrills & groans of the wounded & lacerated (friend or foe) that cry aloud for more blood & more vengeance, more desolation

    Letter to James E. Yeatman (May 1865)

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  • Legate
    replied

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  • SmackUm
    replied
    Masters of Empire

    Masters of Empire (Great Lakes Indians & the Making of America) by Michael McDonnell. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...ters-of-empire
    A history of Fort Michilimackinac and the relationship of the Anishinnabeg with European trading nations in the Great Lakes Region.

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  • Martok
    replied
    Also reading this, which is quite a good book, actually:

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  • Martok
    replied
    I have been reading this series of books, of which there are currently about twelve each dedicated to a different genre:

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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Finish reading "Corps Commanders"



    Three Canadians and two British Corps Commanders in WW2.

    The three Canadians are Burns, Simons and Foulkes. The British were Horrock and Crocker. Horrock and Crocker were chosen because they both had one time or another been under Canadian Command or had Canadian divisions under their command.

    The 300-page book certainly not a detailed bio of each individuals, but a good review of each commander and his style of command. It is well researched. The author, Dr Doug Delaney having already wrote a bio on MGen Bert Hoffmeister, who was Canada's best general in WW2.

    I have never heard of Crocker, so that part was quite an interesting read for me.

    The book confirmed to me that Canada did not have any great Generals during WW2 (except for Hoffmeister and possibly Foster.) Burns, Simons and Foulke were the product of a pre-WW2 Permanent Force, which main job was to train reservists and where technical skills were favored over leadership skills. Burns was fired after commanding 1 Canadian Corps in Italy. Simons was ok, if a micromanager. Foulke is an enigma on how could someone raise through the officer ranks with such low level of competence - Delaney explains Foulke's promotions by simply being at the right place at the right time!



    A good read for anyone interested in Canada's contribution in Europe during WW2.
    Last edited by Capt AFB; 02 Mar 18, 14:43.

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