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  • Martok
    replied
    Also reading this, which is quite a good book, actually:

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  • Martok
    replied
    I have been reading this series of books, of which there are currently about twelve each dedicated to a different genre:

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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Finish reading "Corps Commanders"



    Three Canadians and two British Corps Commanders in WW2.

    The three Canadians are Burns, Simons and Foulkes. The British were Horrock and Crocker. Horrock and Crocker were chosen because they both had one time or another been under Canadian Command or had Canadian divisions under their command.

    The 300-page book certainly not a detailed bio of each individuals, but a good review of each commander and his style of command. It is well researched. The author, Dr Doug Delaney having already wrote a bio on MGen Bert Hoffmeister, who was Canada's best general in WW2.

    I have never heard of Crocker, so that part was quite an interesting read for me.

    The book confirmed to me that Canada did not have any great Generals during WW2 (except for Hoffmeister and possibly Foster.) Burns, Simons and Foulke were the product of a pre-WW2 Permanent Force, which main job was to train reservists and where technical skills were favored over leadership skills. Burns was fired after commanding 1 Canadian Corps in Italy. Simons was ok, if a micromanager. Foulke is an enigma on how could someone raise through the officer ranks with such low level of competence - Delaney explains Foulke's promotions by simply being at the right place at the right time!



    A good read for anyone interested in Canada's contribution in Europe during WW2.
    Last edited by Capt AFB; 02 Mar 18, 13:43.

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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
    After Jeroen's introduction of Robert Harris and reading "The Officer and A Spy" and "Conclave", I am off and running with "Pompeii" and "Enigma" in the ready rack with "Imperium" on order. I like the author's depth of research, character development, storytelling, and command of the language. For these reasons, I will read Munich despite a disappointed ending for Jeroen.
    Well, I finished listening to "Munich" as an audiobook. Great story. Very well researched. I much enjoyed it, even if the very ending is a bit disappointing, and reads like the author does not know how to stop the story- Although it does not detract from the story. (Feels like Harris woke up one morning, walk to his keyboard before having coffee, and said to himself "Oh, well! Let me type something up that is somewhat coherent to end this tale and send the manuscript to the editor!")

    It gave me a much better appreciation of Chamberlain as British PM dealing with Hitler and the mood of the time.

    I wish I listened to the audio book (or read the book) before seeing the movie Darkest Hour, as it would have provided me even better context.

    I may have become a Robert Harris fan.
    Last edited by Capt AFB; 22 Feb 18, 16:06.

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  • Canuckster
    replied
    Originally posted by Poor Old Spike View Post
    PS- as a matter of interest, below are shots of my current book collection, they're all factual, I never buy fiction.
    hmmmm I noticed the pile contains 'The Martian', 'Arrival' and 'Gravity'.

    Not that there is anything wrong with SciFi (I just wanted to be a smartass).

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  • Tuebor
    replied
    Rereading Robert Asprey's At Belleau Wood

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  • McMax
    replied
    Command Missions - A Personal Story By Lucian Truscott.

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  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    27 Articles was a short but interesting read. I could not find the 27 articles on the Internet anywhere, so I bought the book.A bit pricey ($13 Cdn) for 54 pages.

    A good read for anyone involved in COIN operations or have a need to work closely with the locals in a foreign country.
    https://wwi.lib.byu.edu/index.php/Th..._T.E._Lawrence

    These weeks in Iraq, it doesn't leave my desk.

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  • Capt AFB
    replied
    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
    Well I finished reading Korda's bio on Lawrence of Arabia. I highly recommend the 700-page book to anyone interested about TE Lawrence. Quite well researched.

    ... I ordered and received via Amazon 27 Articles written by Lawrence, as guidance to British officers dealing with Arabs. Starting to read it this weekend.
    27 Articles was a short but interesting read. I could not find the 27 articles on the Internet anywhere, so I bought the book.A bit pricey ($13 Cdn) for 54 pages.

    A good read for anyone involved in COIN operations or have a need to work closely with the locals in a foreign country.

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  • OttoHarkaman
    replied
    Sink'em all

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  • Pruitt
    replied
    I am going through my collection of Fox short stories by Adam Henry.

    Pruitt

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  • R.N. Armstrong
    replied
    Umberto Eco, who owns over 40,000 books, when asked by visitors if he has read all the books replies, a personal library should contain knowledge one does not know.

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  • Poor Old Spike
    replied
    I'm currently reading 'The Fatal Shore' about Britain's settling of Australia from the 1700's onwards.
    PS- as a matter of interest, below are shots of my current book collection, they're all factual, I never buy fiction.
    And call me oldfashioned but you can't beat having a solid physical book in your hands rather than kindle or internet images..







    Leave a comment:


  • SmackUm
    replied
    James Mcgill

    James McGill (of Montreal) by Stanley Brice Frost

    James Mcgill is well known as the founder of McGill University, but the rest of his accomplishments remain little known.
    This biography reveals the facinating story of his life's journey from Scotland to America & Canada.
    During his life he was a fur trader,merchant,public servant & colonel in the militia during the War of 1812.
    In Canada, James McGill, alerted by his private sources, was the first to receive and send to the governor general reliable information that the Provinces were at war. His letter dated 24 June, 1812 8 A.M. was brief.
    McGill's greatest concern was the preparation of the militia. During the war of 1812 he commanded the militia that defended Montreal, helping to foil the United States attempts to annex Canada.

    McGill as chairman of the Executive Council imediately called a meeting in Montreal to mobilize the militia. McGill and other fur traders had already written Prevost urging the full use of the trader's services. Having been a fur trader himself he was well aquainted with the members of the North West Company. McGill was influential in the mobilization of The Canadian Corps of Voyageurs but the Montreal Militia continued to be his greatest concern.
    During the conflict he was raised to acting rank of brigadier general and given command of all of the militia forces of the city including the Canadian Fencibles & Canadien Voltigeurs.
    It was a striking confirmation of respect from Sir George Prevost to coin Milton's phrase, he was now in Montreal "our Chief of Men".
    He passed away on the 19 December 1813 after a short illness successful in the defence of his city.

    https://www.amazon.ca/James-McGill-M.../dp/0773512977

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  • Nick the Noodle
    replied


    If I had read this a couple of decades ago, I would have believed it.

    There is no reason why the Authors candidate would have achieved such fame as both the current and past image of Arthur inspires.

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