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  • Andre Malraux "L'espoir" (1937)--not to be confused with his film of the book "Espoir" (finished in 1939, and released in 1945)

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    • A Break From Military History

      Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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      • Started reading Ira D. Gruber's The Howe Brothers and the American Revolution last night. Still haven't finished Sinews of Power. Been writing.

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        • From the Vancouver Public Library I took a loan on these two:

          Sigfried Sassoon "Memoirs of an Infantry Officer"
          Farley Mowat "And No Birds Sang"

          Mowat, who is known in Canada and elsewhere as one of the most famous naturalists of the Great White North, wrote this excellent book on his experiences fighting in an Ontario regiment during the Allied invasion of Italy. In this American edition from 2003/2004, Robert MacNeil does the forward. "And No Birds Sang" is the best Canadian account that I have read so far. It holds up well to the Sassoon's classic semi-autobiographic WWI novels.

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          • I seem to have too many books on the go. Woerking my way through Thomas J. Fleming's Now We Are Enemies. The Story of Bunker Hill. Not far to go. Also reading The Moirs and Anecdotes of The Count De Segur. Have put down the Howe book for the moment.

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            • History of Warfare by John Keegan and the War of Wars by Robert Harvey.

              Also read this summer, Battle of the Atlantic, a book about the Americans who served in the RAF 1939-1941 but can't remember the name, and a BBC book entitled Rome
              The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on.
              Ulysses S. Grant

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              • As a new member of this forum thought I might as well get my feet wet. I have read all of the W.E.B Griffin books and he is my favorite author. My favorite series is "The Brotherhood of War" followed closely by "The Corps". At the present time I am reading Ralph Peters book "The War After Armageddon". For those that have not read it, it takes place probably 20 years in the future. Islam extremists has nuked Israel, Los Angles and Las Vegas. It is set in what was Israel with the Army and Marines fighting on one front and a different US force made up with Christian "Crusaders" fighting on a different front. The "Military Order of the Brothers in Christ" (Crusaders) have as their objective to exterminate any Muslim they come in contact with and reclaim the Holy Land. Most modern technology is worthless so it is basically an infantry war. Very thought provoking book on what happens if "religion" becomes the focus of a war.
                Too Much To Do Too Little Time

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                • Originally posted by Don Maddox View Post
                  The Bear and the Dragon, Tom Clancy.
                  what is it sbout? I only ask because I used to read Clancy's books, but havent in some time, is it any good???
                  "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

                  If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

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                  • Just picked up a copy of Hells Gate, which covers the Battle of the Cherkassy Pocket and also Sledgehammers, Strengths and Weaknesses of Tiger Battalions in World War II.
                    "Only the dead have seen the end of war"...Plato

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                    • Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
                      Good book that but a hard read all the same....

                      Best digested in bits and pieces than swallowed whole IMO...
                      http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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                      • Originally posted by 17poundr View Post
                        what is it sbout? I only ask because I used to read Clancy's books, but havent in some time, is it any good???
                        It's a pretty decent book. Not as good as Red October or Red Storm but worth a read. It is a Jack Ryan novel about a war between Russia and China.
                        If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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                        • Finished Fleming's Now We Are Enemies. Not bad. But it was annoying how he consistently got the name Moulton Point wrong, calling it Morton Point. I very much liked his assessment of Howe's strategy.
                          Now reading the chapter on Bunker Hill in W. J. Wood's Battles of the Revolutionary War, 1775-1781. A good clear exposition so far, especially from the American point of view.

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                          • I just finished a book about Empress Josephine..."The Rose of Martinique"...A Life of Napoleon's Josephine by Andrea Stuart....it's an excellent read and gives you alittle bit more insight of Napoleon himself and the period before the French Revolution and how she was almost sent to the Madame Guillotine ...
                            "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."- Sir Winston Churchill, about R.A.F. fighter pilots."
                            "It is well that war is so terrible, else we grow to fond of it." - Robert E. Lee

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                            • Caen: Anvil of Victory

                              by Alexander McKee. First published in 1964 McKee -who was a participant in the battles - uses unit histories plus accounts of participants from both Allied and Germans to create a historical report of the battles which read like a novel . McKee has some very strong opinions and not very PC views which makes his narrative very personal which is refreshing in a way.

                              Harvey
                              "Now there is one outstandingly important fact regarding Spaceship Earth, and that is that no instruction book came with it." Buckminster Fuller

                              http://harveylevy.blogspot.com/

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                              • Michael Connolly's The Closers
                                "The spirit is willing, but the flesh is spongy and bruised"
                                Zap Brannigan. Futurama

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