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  • A very exhaustive history of the Holocaust.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • Siegfried Sassoon's "Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man".

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      • Recently aquired an Osprey book on landing craft, very interesting but a little disapointing for their were no small landing craft in it such as LCAs and LCMs (1&3) partly my fault I should have read the title closer, 'Landing craft,infantry and fire support'. Even so they could have included the LCA because quite a lot of them were adapted to give close in fire support with mortars! I also found a very rare error in the introduction which said the LCM was able to take up to five tanks ( two small vehicles was there limit) they meant of course the LCT! I will now stop whinging!!
        'By Horse by Tram'.


        I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
        " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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        • WW2 and the ACW





          Like Men Of War is about black soldiers during the ACW.
          Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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          • The last few nights I've been reading "Surviving the Sword: Prisoners of the Japanese 1942-45" by Brian MacArthur. A truly haunting book about the deprivations that thousands endured. The sketches that are included really give a sense of what the men lived through. Highly recommended, but not for the weak of heart. It makes you understand why many of these men could never forgive their captors.

            http://www.amazon.com/Surviving-Swor.../dp/1400064139
            Last edited by Lance Williams; 01 Sep 09, 18:33.
            Lance W.

            Peace through superior firepower.

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            • lurker turned contributor. This is what I am currently reading




              These two books are a series written by George Blackburn and follow the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division and its artillery (for which Blackburn was a Forward Observation Officer (FOO)). The books are an excellent read and the combination Blackburn's firsthand experience, he was the longest serving FOO in the entire Canadian Army (longest serving because he wasn't killed), and its thorough research and use of interviews, it gives a very deep picture and analysis of some of the most intense but sometimes less talked about battles in NW Europe.

              I would definitely recommend these books to anyone interested in WWII but if your throughly read on the usual material (Overlord, Market-Garden, The Bulge, Stephen Ambrose, etc,) then you should definitely take a look in this direction.
              Last edited by squishy321; 01 Sep 09, 20:28.

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              • Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
                http://www.tantor.com/BookImage/0468_NoSimpleVictory_D.jpg
                How is Davies book so far? I read the back of it in the shop but it wasn't able to sell itself to me.

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                • Another of Henry de Wailly's: "1940, L'effondrement" (Editions Perrin, 2000) on the Fall of France; covers all the bases as he did with his book "Syrie 1941".

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                  • Originally posted by -snafu- View Post
                    How is Davies book so far? I read the back of it in the shop but it wasn't able to sell itself to me.
                    So far highly readable. I'm only about 90 pages in, but so far so good. The first few pages are mostly statistics, but then he goes into the moral aspect of the war. Very good stuff. Whether you agree with his conclusions or not, he makes you think.
                    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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                    • Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
                      So far highly readable. I'm only about 90 pages in, but so far so good. The first few pages are mostly statistics, but then he goes into the moral aspect of the war. Very good stuff. Whether you agree with his conclusions or not, he makes you think.
                      Thanks.

                      Added to my very long 'To Buy List'.

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                      • Victor Davis Hanson: The Western Way of War: Infantry Battle in Classical Greece
                        Empathical description of how it felt to be in the hoplite phalanx, wrtitten by a Californian viniculturist (giving him knowledge of Greek agricultural esentials) / classical scholar
                        Apparently, this book inspired Steven Pressfield, author of 'Gates of Fire' in penning his unsurpassed battle scene descriptions
                        BoRG

                        You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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                        • Originally posted by -snafu- View Post
                          Thanks.

                          Added to my very long 'To Buy List'.
                          I have to back off my earlier statement somewhat. The book I have has numerous typos and some dates are wrong. The dates might be typos also, but somehow I think it's sloppy fact checking. For instance, he gives 31 July 1939 as the final date that Hitler gave the order to invade Poland. He then says the German army attacked at dawn. Unless a typo, he's saying WW2 started on 1 August 1939. Got to be a typo. A WW2 historian would not make a mistake like that.

                          Another mistake is when I read "from from" instead of "far from". Distracting to say the least. Maybe it was just bad proof-reading. I hope so anyway.

                          These were just the mistakes I remember off the top of my head. There are others. But Davies does write well and is highly readable.
                          Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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                          • The Fox Wars by R. David Edmunds and Joseph L. Peyser
                            Attached Files
                            "War is sorrowful, but there is one thing infinitely more horrible than the worst horrors of war, and that is the feeling that nothing is worth fighting for..."
                            -- Harper's Weekly, December 31, 1864

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                            • God's Playground by Norman Davies

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                              • The Road to Wigan Pier by G. Orwell, had just finished Down and Out in Paris and London.
                                I often think how much easier the world would have been to manage if Herr Hitler and Signor Mussolini had been at Oxford. Lord Halifax

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