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Favorite History Book Of All-Time

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  • #46
    "The First Team: Pacific Air Combat from Pearl Harbor to Midway". By John B. Lundstrom

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    • #47
      Another book that would be very high on my list would be Barbara Tuchman's The Guns Of August. Extremely readable.

      And right on the heels of that would be Robert Massie's Dreadnought and Castles Of Steel. History writing at it's best.

      Now that I think about it, what was I thinking in asking for just one favorite history book of all-time?
      Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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      • #48
        I have found this thread very helpful and have added several books to my categories.

        I agree that I keep going back to Barbara Tuchman: Guns of August and also The Zimmerman Telegram, which shows succinctly exactly why American entered WWI: it was the 9/11 of the time.

        You can get a lot of history books in audiobook form now. I am listening to Guns of August now and plan to "re-read" Herwig's The Marne in audiobook form next. Audible.com is a good company for that, I've found. I can keep the history going thru driving, shopping, and doing dishes. "Found" time.

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        • #49
          The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors by James D Hornfischer is another excellent book.

          http://www.amazon.com/Last-Stand-Tin...in+can+sailors
          "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

          Homer


          BoRG

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          • #50
            I'm bookmarking this thread and posting a comment as I wont to boost it and hopefully get more suggestions.

            I ordered "Strange Defeat" the second I saw it as I'm still confounded as to the seeming total breakdown of the French and would like to fully understand it.

            BTW, I also read "The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailor's" and agree with the above. Also, did anyone mention "Broken Sword"?

            I'm gonna be bugging you guys much more for books to read 'cause I'm really getting fed up with trying to figure out what books to read using amazon.com reviews. The are so full of sock-puppets, etc that I have been spending as much time trying to sift through the good and bad reviews than I have reading books (slight exaggeration).
            Elsa: [reading Jacob's palm] "See. According to this, you're already dead."[laughs]
            Army Officer: "Mr. Singer. What an appropriate name for a man who can't shut up."
            "Jacob's Ladder"

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            • #51
              Originally posted by jeffdoorgunnr View Post
              History of Marine Corps Aviation in WW2...........by Robert Sherrod.....
              Ordered the above. Thanks jeff.
              Elsa: [reading Jacob's palm] "See. According to this, you're already dead."[laughs]
              Army Officer: "Mr. Singer. What an appropriate name for a man who can't shut up."
              "Jacob's Ladder"

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              • #52
                "The Oxford Companion to World War II" eds. Dear and Foot. Endless excruciatingly detailed information.
                Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
                Hyperwar, Whats New
                World War II Resources
                The best place in the world to "work".

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                • #53
                  Samurai William by Giles Milton - I love the way that Milton opens up the Elizabethan/Tokugawa Period and his narration is sublime.

                  If you are not aware of the book, it is essentially the real story behind Shogun - which you may remember for the Richard Chamberlain TV series.

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                  • #54
                    Guadalcanal: The Definitive Account of the Landmark Battle by Richard B. Frank.

                    Excellent and very detailed book about the Guadalcanal campaign.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by TDurden View Post
                      I'm bookmarking this thread and posting a comment as I wont to boost it and hopefully get more suggestions.

                      I ordered "Strange Defeat" the second I saw it as I'm still confounded as to the seeming total breakdown of the French and would like to fully understand it.

                      BTW, I also read "The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailor's" and agree with the above. Also, did anyone mention "Broken Sword"?

                      I'm gonna be bugging you guys much more for books to read 'cause I'm really getting fed up with trying to figure out what books to read using amazon.com reviews. The are so full of sock-puppets, etc that I have been spending as much time trying to sift through the good and bad reviews than I have reading books (slight exaggeration).
                      Great post. I too am very interested in the rapid French defeat and have ordered both the Bloch (he was a famous historian who wrote this book as soon as he got back from service after the defeat, then joined the Resistance and was killed by Germans!! Well, darn, what a life.) I also ordered "Strange Victory" by May that came up too, the French defeat from the German side. Neither books are put out as ebooks but there are used copies. I have been playing with the idea that the WWII defeat of the French could have something to do with the French Revolution, as of course the French mutinies in 1917 did. However, I don't think there is anything there.

                      One of my very favorite history books -- I reread it -- is Robert O. Paxton's "Anatomy of Fascism." The title sounds dry but it's extremely lively and enlightening about the interwar years.

                      I loved what you said about the Amazon reviews!! Amazon has been desperate to stop the sock-puppetry self-advertising that goes on. They have some good reforms like the "verifiable Amazon purchase" that help, but then authors just get their friends and sockpuppets to buy copies. My favorite, because easy to spot, is a whole line of reviews all in the same style and same length. [Sigh] And at the higher level of reading we are on, I am sometimes morally certain it's the author reviewing his book and three of his graduate students.

                      One trick, if a book has a lot of reviews, is to access the later reviews. Click on "newest first" and read those. The phony reviews are up front because the author rushes to get them out as soon as the book is published, or earlier if possible. The later ones are probably real.

                      I review a lot of books on Amazon and Audible, but always honestly and only if the book doesn't have a lot of reviews --- orphan books, classics, etc. I don't bother reading a book that has faked reviews, of course, as a person with morals like that can't possibly write anything I would care to read.

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                      • #56
                        Empires of the Sea: The siege of Malta, the battle of Lepanto, and the contest for the center of the world by Roger Crowley. There are many others I love but it is the only one Ive read over and over and over and over and over and over...you get the idea

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                        • #57
                          Forgotten Victory by Gary Sheffield

                          http://www.amazon.co.uk/Forgotten-Vi.../dp/0747264600
                          ------
                          'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

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                          • #58
                            Impossible just one but here are three I would choose.
                            Atlas of World History - Haywood
                            The last two million years - Readers digest
                            Decline and fall of the Roman Empire - Gibbons

                            Death bed last words. Always pay the Legions, Septimius Severus.

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                            • #59
                              As ITALICA said it is impossible to chose just one but here are the publications I have used the most:

                              Back in the 70’s I bought a 24 volume series, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the 20th Century WEAPONS and WARFARE. It is now dated but every volume is dog eared due to constant use. These books have gone with me to multiple assignments all over the World and the States. I still read them in the bathroom.

                              My second choice is THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MILITARY HISTORY, by Ernest Dupuy and Trevor N. Dupuy. I first found this book in a school library and bought my own copy as soon as I could, it covers battles and wars from 3500 BC to the 70’s.

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                              • #60
                                My favorite history book is probably The Guns of August by Barbara Tuchman, which has already been mentioned by two other forum members.

                                My favorite biography is probably American Caesar by William Manchester.

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