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Favorite History Book Of All-Time

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  • #31
    The Gettysburg Campaign: A Study in Command by Edwin Coddington. At one time it was described as the Bible to the Licensed Battlefield Guides at Gettysburg.

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    • #32


      From Publishers Weekly
      A premier baseball analyst and brand name, James (The Bill James Player Ratings Book, The Bill James Guide to Baseball Managers) releases a revised edition of his 1985 classic, with expanded player and team histories and reconsidered commentary. Divided into two sections, "The Game" and "The Players," this comprehensive and opinionated tome describes the evolution of the sport over the decades (uniforms in the 1890s, best minor league teams of the 1930s, the Negro Leagues, etc.) and the characteristics of its players (stats, injuries, habits and proclivities). The thumbnail player sketches in the second section (the 100 greatest players at each position) vary widely in content and tone: the entry on Lefty Gomez includes a page on his public-speaking abilities, while of Kevin Brown, James merely writes, "I don't root for him, either, but he is a great pitcher." (James has assigned the rankings according to a statistical rating formula he calls Win Shares, which he explains conceptually and mathematically.) The game section, though, is the standout. It may not contain detailed statistical leaders or standings for each year, or even who won each World Series, but it does offer information on new stadiums, the competitiveness of different leagues and shifts in the way the game was played. At the end of each chapter, a "decade in a box" lists major statistics and Jamesian awards, varying from the quantitative (the team with the best record) and the qualitative (the best switch hitter) to the quirky (the decade's ugliest player). (Dec.)Forecast: There are enough baseball and Bill James fans to ensure steady sales, and the pub date near enough to the World Series might encourage a few extra readers. A uniquely personal, even iconoclastic guide, this belongs in baseball libraries to counterpoint The Baseball Encyclopedia and Total Baseball.
      Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

      --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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      • #33
        There can be only one .......

        Since I've been pushed by Uncle Bob it has to be 'Forgotten Victory - The First World War: Myths and Realities' by Gary Sheffield. It certainly has its flaws but these are inherent to the very nature of the book. Sheffield isn't writing a history of the war he's trying the change the popular perception it so it plays up the successes and glosses over the failures. It's very well written too in that it's accessible but never is its subject matter compromised.

        Signing out.

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        • #34
          In a lifetime of being engaged with history I notice myself coming back to

          Paul Kennedy's: Rise and Fall of the Great Powers.

          BoRG

          You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Major Sennef View Post
            In a lifetime of being engaged with history I notice myself coming back to

            Paul Kennedy's: Rise and Fall of the Great Powers.

            That's a good one. It's on my shelf for most influential books on my life.
            Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by The Ibis View Post
              Good call - enjoy his writing style
              As for me, "Team of Rivals" or "John Adams" or...actually, better think more on this

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              • #37


                I love the grand rather than the nitty gritty. I have an older version that stops after the fall of the USSR, and it gets a read every 12 - 18 months.
                Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the cheesemakers

                That's right bitches. I'm blessed!

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by The Ibis View Post
                  He is a good one. I really enjoyed his Politics of Glory. Really opened my eyes on how the Baseball Hall of Fame election process goes.
                  If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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                  • #39
                    "The Impending Crisis: America Before The Civil War- 18418-1861" by David M. Potter. Absolutely outstanding.
                    "Ultimately communism is an impossible Utopian dream imposed by hypocrites who will commit mass murder to achieve absurd goals"- Trebuchet

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                    • #40
                      Adolph Hitler by John Tolland. I like that it not only covers Hitler, but you get a view of the war in Europe was well. Especially the events leading up to the start. I also like that it is the most unbiased book about Hitler, or the Nazi era in general, that I've ever read.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by VancePolk View Post
                        "The Impending Crisis: America Before The Civil War- 18418-1861" by David M. Potter. Absolutely outstanding.
                        Was that 18418 BC?
                        If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
                          Strange Defeat by Marc Bloch, who as middle ages historian called to active duty, gave me not only the best insight to the collapse of the French Army in May 1940, but also demonstrated the powers of a historian judging contemporary events.
                          Picked that one up in the original French during my recent stay in France.
                          I was hooked after the first few pages.
                          Like with von Clausewitz, Bloch's logic is so dry that become almost humorous.

                          Indeed as an intel officer cum historian Bloch was well positioned to put the events surrounding France's catastrophic collapse in 1940 in a wider perspective.
                          BoRG

                          You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Legate View Post
                            Was that 18418 BC?

                            Ooops...1848
                            "Ultimately communism is an impossible Utopian dream imposed by hypocrites who will commit mass murder to achieve absurd goals"- Trebuchet

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                            • #44
                              I enjoyed Herodotus' Histories. I learned history yet it was a bit more like reading a story-definitely not like a textbook. Plus gotta give credit to the man for traveling all over the place to get his research done. As a bit of a writer myself, I gotta admire that.
                              "A foolish man thinks he knows everything if placed in unexpected difficulty; but he knows not what to answer, if to the test he is put."

                              --Hávamál

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                              • #45
                                I can't choose one but The History of the Second World War by Winston Churchill is my top of the list .

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