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  • Eastern front books?

    I am wondering if anyone knows any comprehensive non-fiction books about the Eastern Front(Russo-German war) during world war 2. replies would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    A little dated, but John Erickson's books "The Road to Stalingrad" and "The Road to Berlin" are always a good read. Basically the entire east front set in 2 books. Very readable.

    Also dated and a good read is "Moscow to Stalingrad: Decision in the East" by Earl Ziemke

    For something a little more up to date, David Glantz's "When Titans Clashed" is a relatively short overall look at the eastern front over the 4 years.
    Last edited by tigersqn; 09 Jan 13, 07:49.
    Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tigersqn View Post
      A little dated, but John Erickson's books "The Road to Stalingrad" and "The Road to Berlin" are always a good read. Basically the entire east front set in 2 books. Very readable.

      Also dated and a good read is "Moscow to Stalingrad: Decision in the East" by Earl Ziemke

      For something a little more up to date, David Glantz's "When Titans Clashed" is a relatively short overall look at the eastern front over the 4 years.
      I struggled through Glantz's book, however short it was. His writing style is a bit dry, but he's so chock full of information because he is the WWII Soviet master.

      Erickson is a great and fluid read, likewise is Ziemke.

      Avoid all Samuel Mitchum titles. It reeks of pro-Germanism that your Black Forest Strudel caked teeth will hurt.

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      • #4
        Panzers on the Eastern front-

        23 combat engagements 1941-1945 by General Raus, 6th Panzer division.

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        • #5
          I've got to say that given the current state of the book market in the West and the unwillingness of Western publishing houses to translate and publish post-Soviet research made by Russian scholars, the language factor will become a severe limitation for you if you intend to get a more fair and objective picture of this conflict.

          You won't miss with anything from Glantz, he is a very thorough researcher. While his books might be hard to read because of his style, you won't find these little irritating errors in names and dates Overy has, to bring up just one example. By the way, Overy not bad either, just don't use him as a reference book for dates and Russian names.

          http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_...s=glantz+david
          www.histours.ru

          Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ShAA View Post
            I've got to say that given the current state of the book market in the West and the unwillingness of Western publishing houses to translate and publish post-Soviet research made by Russian scholars, the language factor will become a severe limitation for you if you intend to get a more fair and objective picture of this conflict.

            You won't miss with anything from Glantz, he is a very thorough researcher. While his books might be hard to read because of his style, you won't find these little irritating errors in names and dates Overy has, to bring up just one example. By the way, Overy not bad either, just don't use him as a reference book for dates and Russian names.

            http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_...s=glantz+david
            I believe Glantz has a tome on "forgotten" (on purpose) Soviet debacles.

            p.s. Be sure to read HELL'S GATE, about the Cherkassy (Korsun) Pocket.
            There was more than one Stalingrad like disaster. By D.E. Nash

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            • #7
              Other works comparable to Erickson's reference above are Paul Carell's Hitler Moves East and Scorched Earth (from a German perspective, but engaging narrative style) and earl Ziemke's two volumes Moscow to Stalingrad: Decision in the East and Stalingrad to Berlin: The German Defeat in the East (gives a fairly balanced perspective).

              Short works are Richard Overy's Russia's War: A history of the Soviet War Effort: 1941-1945 and Evan Mawdsley's Thunder in the East: The Nazi-Soviet War 1941-1945 (this benefits from some Red Army archival material released before 2005)

              These should keep you off the streets for a while.

              And, welcome aboard!!
              Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Tascosa View Post
                I believe Glantz has a tome on "forgotten" (on purpose) Soviet debacles.

                Yep, here is a synopsis of it to whet your appetite.

                http://fmso.leavenworth.army.mil/documents/failures.htm

                [/QUOTE]
                Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dunnigan View Post
                  I struggled through Glantz's book, however short it was. His writing style is a bit dry, but he's so chock full of information because he is the WWII Soviet master.

                  Erickson is a great and fluid read, likewise is Ziemke.

                  Avoid all Samuel Mitchum titles. It reeks of pro-Germanism that your Black Forest Strudel caked teeth will hurt.

                  The only Glantz I've read is a 100 page paper giving an overview of the German-Soviet war. It was pretty good.

                  I liked Ziemke's works. His "Moscow to Stalingrad" is better than his "Stalingrad to Berlin".

                  Erickson's "Road to Stalingrad" I've read twice. The first time I found it too dry and heavy, a bit overrated. For some reason the second time around was an easier read and much more enjoyable...though I can't expain why that is.
                  "Ultimately communism is an impossible Utopian dream imposed by hypocrites who will commit mass murder to achieve absurd goals"- Trebuchet

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
                    Other works comparable to Erickson's reference above are Paul Carell's Hitler Moves East and Scorched Earth (from a German perspective, but engaging narrative style) and earl Ziemke's two volumes Moscow to Stalingrad: Decision in the East and Stalingrad to Berlin: The German Defeat in the East (gives a fairly balanced perspective).

                    Short works are Richard Overy's Russia's War: A history of the Soviet War Effort: 1941-1945 and Evan Mawdsley's Thunder in the East: The Nazi-Soviet War 1941-1945 (this benefits from some Red Army archival material released before 2005)

                    These should keep you off the streets for a while.

                    And, welcome aboard!!
                    Carell's books are like Der Landser booklet in greater format, entertaining but there is better historical work out there imo. Two great authors(tough i don't know if they were translated) are Rolf Hinze and Wilhelm Tieke.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bierbaron View Post
                      Carell's books are like Der Landser booklet in greater format, entertaining but there is better historical work out there imo. Two great authors(tough i don't know if they were translated) are Rolf Hinze and Wilhelm Tieke.
                      Hinze's books are starting to be published in English but the translations leave a bit to be desired which makes reading them them heavier going than it should be.
                      Signing out.

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                      • #12
                        The most entertaining/engrossing one, and also a 'light read' is Kershaw's War without Garlands.

                        I have bought many this year and here they are:

                        Road to Stalingrad

                        David M. Glantz: Stumbling Colossus, From Don to Dnieper, After Stalingrad, To the Gates of Stalingrad, Armageddon at Stalingrad

                        Stopped at Stalingrad: The Luftwaffe and Hitler's Defeat in the East

                        Red Army Tank Commanders: The Armored Guards

                        Beyond Stalingrad: Manstein and the operations of Army Group Don

                        Dunn: Kursk, Hitler's Gamble, Soviet Blitzkrieg, Stalin's Key to Victory, Hitler's Nemesis

                        Companion to the Red Army, Zaloga

                        Slaughterhouse, Handbook of the Eastern Front

                        Red Storm on the Reich

                        Nipe: Decision in the Ukraine, Last Victory in Russia

                        Guns against the Reich

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                        • #13
                          I picked up a book at a book sale called Russia at War. Has anyone read it? Is it reliable?
                          "A foe who had fought so long and valiantly, and had suffered so much for a cause, though that cause was, I believe, one of the worst for which a people ever fought, and one for which there was the least excuse." Ulysses S. Grant

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                          • #14
                            You might try Absolute War by Chris Bellamy. It is a pretty good overview. Though it is long, I found it to be a very interesting and readable book.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bierbaron View Post
                              Carell's books are like Der Landser booklet in greater format, entertaining but there is better historical work out there imo. Two great authors(tough i don't know if they were translated) are Rolf Hinze and Wilhelm Tieke.
                              I have one of Tieke's books translate into English: Tragedy of the Faithful: A History of the III. (germanische) SS-Panzer Korps. Quite good and includes one of the more detailed accounts of the battle of Narva.
                              As for Carell, his Hitler moves East 1941-1943 is still one of my favourite books regarding the war on the Eastern front. The reason has nothing to do with its scholarship, as it is one of the most one-sided accounts of the fighting you will ever find and moreover one which manages to completely remove any distasteful commentary regarding German excesses against either the civilian population or Soviet prisoners of war. That said, however, it is likely the most engaging and compelling narrative in print.

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