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  • #16
    Originally posted by Dan M View Post
    For a really interesting read I can also recommend The Myth of The Great War by John Mosier. You don't have to agree with all of his arguments, but they are extremely compelling to read and may change your views on some things.


    Cheers,
    Dan.
    Definitely not. Mosier is not a very good historian. See Lodestar's thread in the WW2 section.

    I'd recommend Forgotten Victory - The First World War: Myths and Realities, by Gary Sheffield.
    A wild liberal appears! Conservative uses logical reasoning and empirical evidence! It's super effective! Wild liberal faints.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Destroyer25 View Post
      Definitely not. Mosier is not a very good historian. See Lodestar's thread in the WW2 section.

      I'd recommend Forgotten Victory - The First World War: Myths and Realities, by Gary Sheffield.
      Actually I find Mosier's WWI books extensively researched and notated. Unlike many Great War historians Mosier doesn't just blindly accept the Anglo-French propaganda put out during and after the war and furthered by novelists like Tuchman.

      I would recommend the reader judge Mosier's books for themselves and go in with an open mind.... even if you don't agree with all his conclusions you will be impressed with his research.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Jestre View Post
        Actually I find Mosier's WWI books extensively researched and notated. Unlike many Great War historians Mosier doesn't just blindly accept the Anglo-French propaganda put out during and after the war and furthered by novelists like Tuchman.

        I would recommend the reader judge Mosier's books for themselves and go in with an open mind.... even if you don't agree with all his conclusions you will be impressed with his research.
        Not sure on that. I think that the majority of ACG's distinguished members will probably agree that he is not a credible scholar.
        A wild liberal appears! Conservative uses logical reasoning and empirical evidence! It's super effective! Wild liberal faints.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Jestre View Post
          I too loved Mosier's "The Myth of The Great War" and just received his new book on Verdun today and hope to start it soon!!!!
          Mosier is just an English teacher, not an historian. He has little knowledge of the subject and just repeats stereo types.

          A good book on the British army in Ww1 us Gary Sheffield's Forgotten Victory which tells the story of the development of the British and Commonwealth army in Ww1.

          Destroyer already said exactly what I said....
          Last edited by Surrey; 04 Oct 13, 01:42.
          "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Surrey View Post
            Mosier is just an English teacher, not an historian. He has little knowledge of the subject and just repeats stereo types.

            Wow, what a statement. First off I wasn't aware that being an historian precluded anyone from being anything else, Winston Churchill was just a Politician and Basil Liddell Hart was just a soldier but they put out some well received books I do believe. Your statement that Mosier has little knowledge of the subject is ridiculous, he has written extensively on the Great War and presented mounds of research and data few other historians have bothered with (which pretty much includes any research outside of England and France).
            Your statement that he uses stereotypes is also ridiculous, if anything Mosier is an iconoclast, refuting many of the very stereotypes that most anglocentric historians put forth.
            You may not like what Mosier concludes from his exhaustive research into the Great War but to call him uninformed and stereotypical is just absurd.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Jestre View Post
              Wow, what a statement. First off I wasn't aware that being an historian precluded anyone from being anything else, Winston Churchill was just a Politician and Basil Liddell Hart was just a soldier but they put out some well received books I do believe. Your statement that Mosier has little knowledge of the subject is ridiculous, he has written extensively on the Great War and presented mounds of research and data few other historians have bothered with (which pretty much includes any research outside of England and France).
              Your statement that he uses stereotypes is also ridiculous, if anything Mosier is an iconoclast, refuting many of the very stereotypes that most anglocentric historians put forth.
              You may not like what Mosier concludes from his exhaustive research into the Great War but to call him uninformed and stereotypical is just absurd.
              Mosier makes very little use of primary documents, he just hand picks evidence from secondary ones that support his positions. He's in fact a lazy fool and no real historian.
              A wild liberal appears! Conservative uses logical reasoning and empirical evidence! It's super effective! Wild liberal faints.

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              • #22
                There really isn't a single-volume history that can cover the build up to war and its progress. A few suggestions to add to those already made

                Geoffrey Barraclough's 'From Agadir to Armageddon' offers up an interesting perspective on the journey to WW1.

                S R Williamson's 'The Politics of Grand Strategy' covers the growth of the Anglo-French Entente into a quasi military alliance.

                Keith Wilson's 'Decisions For War - 1914' is a collection of essays that makes a good primer for anyone interested in studying the July Crisis.

                Martin Gilbert's 'First World War' provides a solid, if unspectacular, narrative account of the war. It's as good as any to allow you to put more detailed works into the context of the war itself. His 'Atlas of WW1' is worth having (well, any atlas of WW1 really) for the same reason.
                Signing out.

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                • #23
                  West Point's WW1 Atlas is also a good buy IMO.
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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Destroyer25 View Post
                    Mosier makes very little use of primary documents, he just hand picks evidence from secondary ones that support his positions. He's in fact a lazy fool and no real historian.
                    LOL

                    Another fascinating iconoclastic book I enjoyed was "Haig's Command: A Reassessment" by Denis Winter. Winter uses Haig's own original diary and Australian sources to make the case against Haig, possibly the worst commander in British history.
                    Last edited by Jestre; 04 Oct 13, 15:16.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Jestre View Post
                      LOL

                      Another fascinating iconoclastic book I enjoyed was "Haig's Command: A Reassessment" by Denis Winter. Winter uses Haig's own original diary and Australian sources to make the case against Haig, possibly the worst commander in British history.
                      Not really iconoclastic, I think. Haig's reputation has taken a considerable battering over the years:-"Lions led by Donkeys" ,and all that. It was John Terraine's Douglas Haig: The Educated Soldier (1963) that questioned the hitherto accepted view and revealed Haig's performance in a different light.

                      A balanced view can be gained from Gary Sheffield's Forgotten Victory:-previously recommended. I can also recommend anything written by Richard Holmes and Lyn MacDonald.
                      "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                      Samuel Johnson.

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                      • #26
                        I would join the chorus of support for A World Undone. A great general history of the war.

                        I haven't read Mosier's book but read a rather biting critique of it. However, the controversy makes me want to make up my own mind

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Jestre View Post
                          LOL

                          Another fascinating iconoclastic book I enjoyed was "Haig's Command: A Reassessment" by Denis Winter. Winter uses Haig's own original diary and Australian sources to make the case against Haig, possibly the worst commander in British history.
                          Actually he doesn't use Haig's original diary. If you want a book that does that check out Gary Sheffield and John Bourne's recent book. Winter's screed has been thoroughly debunked by a number of authors, not all of which are fans of the man by any means but prefer a more balanced assessment of one of the most successful commanders in British history.
                          Signing out.

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                          • #28
                            Anyone know any good books on the Middle Eastern Theatre of WW1?

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by jamse View Post
                              Anyone know any good books on the Middle Eastern Theatre of WW1?
                              Eden to Armageddon: World War I in the Middle East by Roger Ford. Excellent book covering all theaters including the Caucasus from both sides POV.

                              Michael

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Cyan67 View Post
                                Eden to Armageddon: World War I in the Middle East by Roger Ford. Excellent book covering all theaters including the Caucasus from both sides POV.

                                Michael
                                Thanks, I'll check it out.

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