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  • Europa Universalis: Rome

    Europa Universalis: Rome Q&A - First Details

    "Grand strategy games that model centuries of history across multiple continents can often be complex and intimidating, but the Europa Universalis series has always attempted to bridge the gap between hardcore, high-level strategy, and accessible, dynamic real-time gameplay. The series is now turning its sights to the ancient Roman Empire, with a brand-new setting, new armies, and many more new features. Producer Johan Andersson explains."
    Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

  • #2
    Developer Diary EU Rome
    Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

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    • #3
      I can't wait to play it!
      Historia Magistra Vitae.
      M. T. Cicero

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Warlord View Post
        I can't wait to play it!
        Me neither. While I would have prefered a Hearts of Iron 3 (fingers crossed ) this does look to be a very interesting game, and one that I will most definetly pick up!

        When DoD saw the announcement for the game, he decided to start re-playing his EU3 games.

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        • #5
          Does look cool indeed. And I agree, would love to see Hearts of Iron 3 someday too!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by daemonofdecay View Post
            Me neither. While I would have prefered a Hearts of Iron 3 (fingers crossed ) this does look to be a very interesting game, and one that I will most definetly pick up!

            When DoD saw the announcement for the game, he decided to start re-playing his EU3 games.
            Me too; but I'm just worried how HOI III'd work without scripted events. Paradox has said that's gone now...just like in EUIII after you start history goes out the window (Which makes sense for a game like that-why have the Thirty Years War as a set event if you're Austria with a very developed sense of tolerance?) but how will HOI survive? I'm very worried...


            Also, DoD; I've been doing a Lithuania game but its been sixty years and I'm still in a personal union with poland (After three kings have died!) anything I can do to stop it?
            And it's over the mountain and over the Main,
            Through Gibralter, to France and Spain.
            Pit a feather tae your bonnet, and a kilt aboon your knee,
            Enlist my bonnie laddie and come awa with me.

            Comment


            • #7
              Also: have to give Johan some props here

              GS: Finally, is there anything else you'd like to add about Europa Universalis: Rome?

              JA: "Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam."

              GS: Yes. Thank you for that
              And it's over the mountain and over the Main,
              Through Gibralter, to France and Spain.
              Pit a feather tae your bonnet, and a kilt aboon your knee,
              Enlist my bonnie laddie and come awa with me.

              Comment


              • #8
                New York, USA (November 9, 2007) Paradox Interactive revealed today the key features of their next grand strategy game - Rome. The critically acclaimed Paradox development team will bring the greatest cultural and military civilizations to life through this epic title filled with great strategic and tactical depth, scheduled for release during Q2, 2008.

                Key Features

                - Fully 3D map with integrated graphics and detailed topography
                - Start at any date between 280 B.C. and 27 B.C.
                - Choose between 10 different cultures, including the Roman, Celtic, Greek and Egyptian civili*zations, with more than 53 playable factions on a map spanning hundreds of provinces.
                - Watch your characters develop new traits through political intrigue and various interactions with thousands of other characters.
                - Trade, negotiate or fight with your neighbours and advance your technologies to unite the Mediterranean World.
                - Robust multiplayer allows you to challenge up to 32 players either competitively or in co-op mode.
                Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tankboy View Post
                  Me too; but I'm just worried how HOI III'd work without scripted events. Paradox has said that's gone now...just like in EUIII after you start history goes out the window (Which makes sense for a game like that-why have the Thirty Years War as a set event if you're Austria with a very developed sense of tolerance?) but how will HOI survive? I'm very worried...
                  HoI would never work without those events, I agree. I don't think they'll remove them from HoI, because the game just wouldn't work without them.


                  Also, DoD; I've been doing a Lithuania game but its been sixty years and I'm still in a personal union with poland (After three kings have died!) anything I can do to stop it?
                  I can't remember, really. Maybe the Polish king just hasn't died yet?

                  I would suggest checking the EU Wiki or the Paradox forums.

                  What I love is how sometimes AI alliances will never go away, even after a couple hundred years.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well no, he has died. This is the third guy who's succeeded him now. I've check and it just says wait it out...

                    I'll probably restart.
                    And it's over the mountain and over the Main,
                    Through Gibralter, to France and Spain.
                    Pit a feather tae your bonnet, and a kilt aboon your knee,
                    Enlist my bonnie laddie and come awa with me.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      HOI takes place at a specific moment in human history after events have already led up to it; you don't get to change the backstory, only the play on the stage. It's a completely different gaming concept that just happens to use the same engine as a 'change the course of human history' game.

                      I played an EU3 game where England took over the world... every single space... by 1783. I did cheat like crazy just to see if it could be done (there's no way to take out Europe, the Middle East, India, AND China without doing it)... and it could... but that was after I had already conquered the Americas, Sub-Sahara Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands.

                      The point being you're not 'changing' the course of world history with HOI like you are EU, you're just altering a 10-year period of it (a fine hair of difference, but one nonetheless).
                      If voting could really change things, it would be illegal.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        EU: Rome Economy and Technology system

                        Economy system

                        The Economy system in EU: Rome is equipped with underlying nuances and complex strategic options, yet the game is developed so that it is easy to grasp.

                        There are three different types of income in Rome, the 3 T´s.

                        TAX: the definition of basic income from the land. This value depends heavily on the amount of slaves in a province. Slaves are one of the three different types of population in the game. The other two are citizens and freemen, which provide advances and manpower. These three types determine the strength of a state, for instance while a long and bloody war may give a lot new slaves, the amount of freemen could drop oo low as a result, making difficult to create strong armies for the future.

                        TRIBUTE: refers to the diplomatic income given from states for their own benefit, could be derived by force or through skilled diplomacy.

                        TRADE ROUTES: each trade route created will provide a certain amount of income to a country, in addition to the strategic benefits of upholding such a route.

                        Technology system

                        The technology system has 5 categories: land, construction, naval, civic and religion. Each category has a set amount of levels, somewhat similar to earlier releases Europa Universalis III and Victoria. However, one of the differences is that there are no immediate effects from aquiring new ``level´´ of technology in EU:Rome.

                        For each type of technology, players can appoint a character to a position in the government, where his skill will affect the progress in this field. The other major factors affecting the progress is the Civilization Value of a province and the amount of Citizens present.
                        Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by chrisvalla View Post
                          HOI takes place at a specific moment in human history after events have already led up to it; you don't get to change the backstory, only the play on the stage. It's a completely different gaming concept that just happens to use the same engine as a 'change the course of human history' game.

                          I played an EU3 game where England took over the world... every single space... by 1783. I did cheat like crazy just to see if it could be done (there's no way to take out Europe, the Middle East, India, AND China without doing it)... and it could... but that was after I had already conquered the Americas, Sub-Sahara Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands.

                          The point being you're not 'changing' the course of world history with HOI like you are EU, you're just altering a 10-year period of it (a fine hair of difference, but one nonetheless).
                          I agree, but I'd heard that all games were not going to be event driven; although with all the expansion packs for HOI II you can alter history significantly- it gives you another twenty years ('64 I think) to fight it out.
                          And it's over the mountain and over the Main,
                          Through Gibralter, to France and Spain.
                          Pit a feather tae your bonnet, and a kilt aboon your knee,
                          Enlist my bonnie laddie and come awa with me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            New screens of Rome
                            Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              `The Great Survivors´
                              Will Egypt be your country of choice in Europa Universalis Rome?

                              New York, USA (March 7, 2008) Europa Universalis: Rome - Across the seductive blue seas of the Mediterranean, to the welcoming golden sands of this ancient land. Learn about the kingdom of Ptolemaic Egypt - `The Great Survivors´.

                              Read about its founder Diadochi Ptolemy, ex-bodyguard to Alexander the Great. Learn of his vision for an independent kingdom and its ever-fragile existence, in the midst of disputes, war and invasion.

                              Discover her ultimate fate and the identities of its two most famous lovers.
                              ************************************************** ********

                              Egypt – The great survivors

                              Ptolemaic Egypt was he 3rd and longest surviving of the major successor states of the Alexander’s Empire. The kingdom was founded by the Diadochi Ptolemy. Ptolemy was a childhood friend and constant companion of Alexander the Great and one of his most trusted bodyguards. At the death of Alexander, Ptolemy was one of those who believed that the empire would not hold together and planned accordingly.

                              At the settlement of Babylon Ptolemy manoeuvred himself into the role of satrap of Egypt, a rich and easily defensible it was the perfect place to carve out an Independent kingdom. However Ptolemy was also aware that if any of the warring generals could hold the Empire together then his plans of an independent kingdom would be at an end. His first move was to size the body of Alexander the Great as it returned to Macedonia; under the Macedonian rules of Kingship the heir to the throne was the one who buried the predecessor. By taking the body to Egypt Ptolemy sought to block anyone else claiming to be the legitimate heir of Alexander. The set off the wars of Diadochi to determine how the inheritance of Alexander was to be divided. Ptolemy being a senior general and holding rich territory was a key player in these wars and was even offered the regency of the Kingdom in the name Alexander’s infant son. However Ptolemy was never distracted from his goal of securing an independent Egypt and would never succumb to the temptation of the ultimate prize. He would also freely switch sides according to what best suited him.

                              When the dust finally settled Ptolemy held Egypt, Cyprus a string of cities along the south coast of Asia Minor and the southern part of Syria. The Ptolemaic claim to Syria was particularly problematic as due to Ptolemy’s constant side switching the province had been promised to Seleucus. This would lead to regular warfare between the two kingdoms. With the death of Ptolemy (283BC), who became know as king Ptolemy I Soter (or saviour), his successors would continue to try and hold the lands he held with various degrees of success. He frontier in Syria would shift backwards and forwards between the two empires for the next 100 years. Determined in part by the abilities of the particularly monarchs the two Kingdoms had at the moment. This cycle was finally broken by Antiochus the Great who carved up much of the Egyptian Empire with Phillip of Macedonia. Egypt would be reduced to a rump kingdom of Egypt and Cyprus.

                              Endemic weakness set in, as various claimants to the throne would vie for power, whoever Egypt was a rich prize and Rome was determined to ensure that it did not fall into the wrong hands. The most famous of these was when Antiochus IV of Seleucid Empire invaded Egypt In 168BC. The consular Gaius Popillius Laenus, was sent by the Roman senate to find out what was happening. Gaius ordered Antiochus to go home, who replied that he would consider the request. So the Roman drew a circle around Antiochus and told him “Before you step out of that circle give me a reply to lay before the senate", Antiochus went home.

                              Egypt would continue to remain unstable but with its new neighbour Rome being happy to leave things that way as long as they did not spill over into Roman politics. However the war between Julius Caesar and Pompey the Great would start the chain that would end the Kingdom. Pompey fled to Egypt after is defeat in Greece, with Caesar and his loyal legions in hot pursuit. At the time Ptolomey XIII and Cleopatra VII were fighting a civil war, and both wanted Rome’s support. Ptolomey had Pompey executed believing that Caesar would be pleased to have his rival removed. Caesar reacted in exacly the opposite manner, (reasons for this differ, some claim that Caesar could never stand to see a true Roman executed by eastern barabrains, others say that he wanted to show Pompey mercy). The end result was that Cleopatra would win and a rather famous love affair would happen. Eh result of this union was the only know natural son of Julius Caesar , Caesarion, or to be more accurate Julius Caesar would never deny that Caesarion was his son. Although her attempt to have Caesarion named Julius Caesar official heir failed, the child seems to have been enough to persuade Caesar not to annex Egypt.

                              The assassination of Julius Caesar removed the certainties that Cleopatra built her power on. The fall out lead to the Roman world divided between Octavian in West and Mark Anthony in the East. In this contest Cleopatra chose Mark Anthony. Being in close proximity made the choice easier for Cleopatra, but Mark Anthony was also the more experienced of the two men and looked the better bet.

                              However it would be the younger Octavian who would win the war and become master of the Mediterranean. The wealth of Egypt was needed to pay the costs of the civil war, and so the last of the Kingdoms of the Diadochi was annexed to now Roman Empire in 30BC. The young Caesarion was killed, probably on the orders of Octavian, as "Two Caesars is one too many".

                              Egypt was a wealthy but static kingdom, there was no least line of Resistance to expand into that Carthage (Spain) or Rome (Cisapline Gaul) had. The Ptolomaic Kingdom needed to wait for its enemies to be weak, but these oportunities never came at the right time.
                              Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

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