Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Matrix Game's War in the Pacific, and my epic tale...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 16-30 June 1945

    CBI Theater: China requires no real input from me.
    Burma was quiet.

    Operation Typhoon (the invasion of Japan): Only Hirosaki holds out on the main island. We took Hakodate on Hokkaido, the large north island, and more landings are planned.

    Operation Godzilla, the SLRB program: This B-29s have stood down for repairs & refitting.

    Losses to date: (Not counting the losses at Pearl Harbor) ‘+#’ is the losses in this period.
    Allies 22,795 aircraft (+235), 1833 ships (+44); including the BBs Alabama, California, Pennsylvania, CVL Hermes, CVs Hornet, Lexington, Wasp, Yorktown.

    Japanese 36,125 aircraft (+729) and 1945 ships (+92), including the BBs Fuso, Haruna, Hyuga, Ise, Kirishima, Kongo, Musashi, Mutsu, Nagato, Yamato, CVLs Ryujo, Shoho, CVs Akagi, Amagi, Aso, Hiyo, Hiryu, Junyo, Kasagi, Katauragi, Taiho, Zuikaku.

    My goal now is to push the point level to automatic victory by inflicting losses upon the Japanese while avoiding losses myself.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

    Comment


    • On 7-3-45 the scenario ended with an automatic win for the Allies. This meant that I had accumulated twice as many victory points as the Japanese. From the victory screen I was returned to the tactical screen, but with Japanese forces fully visible to me. It was quite an education; the heaviest ship left to them was a CA (three, in fact). Fuel was non-existent, supplies nearly so, and their support fleet was minimal.

      This was a long haul, one day per turn, from 12-8-41 to 7-3-45; the game took on many characteristics as the strategic and operational pictures changed. In the early days I fretted over individual squadrons and waited anxiously for replacements, in the latter days my problem was finding enough airstrips to house the available aircraft.

      The AI was tough; I can’t count the number of times I thought I was going to have disaster visited upon me; the thrusts to Canton & Baker Islands, the First Battle of Johnson’s Island…the list is long. I have played all the earlier versions of this game, and can say with certainty that the AI is leaps and bounds ahead of what came before.

      Looking back on the campaign, from a mechanical sense I see that I did not understand the importance of Political Points until mid-’42; it had not cost me much if anything at that point, but it certainly became important later.

      Strategically, I feel my decision to attack straight up the center of the Pacific has been vindicated; I admit I considered Formosa most carefully, but in the end I think the advantages gained from its air bases would have not offset the time lost.

      My greatest mistake in the campaign was my failure to adequately prepare for Truk. At that point I had become extremely overconfident in my ability to deliver assault troops to shore, and support them until they accomplished the job. At Truk I did not have sufficient supplies stockpiled, or enough bombers within range. As a result the heavy coastal defense guns succeeded in interrupting resupply efforts and dragged the fighting out for weeks. It was at Truk that I truly thought I would lose the conflict. Ironically, it was a far harder fighter than any which followed it. Never again would I launch an invasion without sufficient air preparation and follow-on resources.

      The best part of this campaign has been the involvement of those of you who followed my after-action reports; having to post my successes and failures added a dimension to the game that utterly transformed the experience. I cannot thank you enough, for your involvement, viewpoints, and comments took this game to a level that it would not have achieved otherwise.

      Again, thank you.
      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

      Comment


      • A very entertaining read. I was enraptured the entire way through. Thank you for the read again.
        First Counsul Maleketh of Jonov

        Comment


        • Thanks for sharing.
          "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

          Homer


          BoRG

          Comment


          • One of the best AAR's I have followed for a very long time, excellent effort, now rest up because I hear the Emperor is calling you.

            Very well done AJ
            An 18th century Imagi nation blog set in England/

            Comment


            • Fantastic AAR. Thanks for taking the time to post it.
              Boston Strong!

              Comment


              • Never missed a day, checking the forum to see how the campaign was progressing. Nicely done.

                Comment


                • Thank you for the long and detailed account of your campaign. It was very interesting. I would check twice a day for your Sit-Reps to see how things were coming along. I honestly was somewhat doubtful about your campaign plan as it was major departure from the actual war plan, but in the end you totally confirmed it's effectiveness.

                  You might be interested to know that my father was an immigrant to the US and joined the US Army Air Corp very late in the war. I think it was summer of 1945. He served in Japanese Occupation forces under General MacArthur after the war. He just missed combat due to appendicitis that delayed his training by a couple months. In exchange for his service he was granted US citizenship.

                  Three huzzahs for Adm. Rimmer and two extra rations of grog!

                  Huzzah! Huzzah! Huzzah!

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by StellarRat View Post
                    Thank you for the long and detailed account of your campaign. It was very interesting. I would check twice a day for your Sit-Reps to see how things were coming along. I honestly was somewhat doubtful about your campaign plan as it was major departure from the actual war plan, but in the end you totally confirmed it's effectiveness.

                    You might be interested to know that my father was an immigrant to the US and joined the US Army Air Corp very late in the war. I think it was summer of 1945. He served in Japanese Occupation forces under General MacArthur after the war. He just missed combat due to appendicitis that delayed his training by a couple months. In exchange for his service he was granted US citizenship.

                    Three huzzahs for Adm. Rimmer and two extra rations of grog!

                    Huzzah! Huzzah! Huzzah!

                    Thank you.

                    And to be honest, there were several points I was doubting the soundness of my campaign plan, myself.

                    I have read a great deal of the history of the PTO, but this particular game really opened my eyes to a lot of things. One of which was that given the amount of lead time in planning and assembling supplies, men, and logistical support, changing targets becomes less and less an option.

                    I agonized over a lot of choices; as you could tell, while my central concept never changed, the specific details were frequently modified.
                    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                    Comment


                    • Congrats on your win, sir! Are you going to play it from the Japanese POV now?
                      SGT, 210th MP Battalion, 2nd MP BDE, MSSG

                      Fervently PRO-TRUMP, anti-Islam and anti-Steelers!

                      Comment


                      • I'll be contacting you soon about game mechanics. Its rather important to know the means of loading ships, convoy set up, etc if one is to play Japan.

                        Worst game manual I think I'v ever seen. I think it was written by someone who already knew all the details and expected everyone else to already know how to play.

                        I'll load the scenario covering the Aleutian Island reconquest and pm you the questions
                        The Purist

                        Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Matt Jones View Post
                          Congrats on your win, sir! Are you going to play it from the Japanese POV now?
                          Thanks1

                          Probably, although not the full campaign, but a small scenario to see whsat it feels like.
                          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by The Purist View Post
                            I'll be contacting you soon about game mechanics. Its rather important to know the means of loading ships, convoy set up, etc if one is to play Japan.

                            Worst game manual I think I'v ever seen. I think it was written by someone who already knew all the details and expected everyone else to already know how to play.

                            I'll load the scenario covering the Aleutian Island reconquest and pm you the questions
                            Fire away, I'll share what I know.
                            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by The Purist View Post
                              I'll be contacting you soon about game mechanics. Its rather important to know the means of loading ships, convoy set up, etc if one is to play Japan.

                              Worst game manual I think I'v ever seen. I think it was written by someone who already knew all the details and expected everyone else to already know how to play.

                              I'll load the scenario covering the Aleutian Island reconquest and pm you the questions
                              If it makes you feel any better I had the exact same problems/complaints. The manual REALLY needs a step by step tutorial on how to prepare and conduct a landing. My two attempts at the Aleutian campaign were disasters. I couldn't get my troops and supplies ashore. Also, I had problems understanding how airbases are built, how much capacity they could handle, supplies, how important HQ's are, etc... It was big mess. The only thing I did pretty well at was leveling Attu and Kiska. I was able to totally knock out their airstrips for weeks with some bombardment TF's and bombing.

                              Comment


                              • I'm no expert, but I can help with those issues. PM away.
                                Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                                Comment

                                Latest Topics

                                Collapse

                                Working...
                                X