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ACG Article: The State of Wargaming

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  • ACG Article: The State of Wargaming

    An interesting survey of the wargaming hobby (mostly boardgaming, but some computer wargaming as well).

    http://www.armchairgeneral.com/artic...&page=1&cat=59
    Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

    I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

  • #2
    "Disco and lava lamps have long since departed to the tackiest ring of hell."



    Blasphemer!! The gall!! The audacity!! I refuse to read any further!!

    Just kidding.

    No, I do not think PC wargaming is dead. I'm deep inside Misnk '44 right now, A John Tiller / Panzer Campaigns Game, and it's exactly what you would expect from a Tiller game: top quality that gets better and better.

    Now, that's not to say that the genre may be barely breathing. Consider this: Who's the next John Tiller, the next person to program his digital blood, sweat and tears into the art of PC wargaming? Sure, there are Matrix Games and others, but that seems much different than a small, independent wargame developer. There are college courses taught now on how to make PC games; anyone know where you can go to learn how to make a wargame? Seems that FPS and RTS games get the most attention. Hence, I'm afraid traditional TBS wargaming may disappear if we are not careful.
    Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

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    • #3
      Paper Games

      I wonder what effect Print on Demand games (such as the bonus games included in ACG) would have on the market if the concept were adopted more generally. The designer would sell a PDF of the game and sell that for the end-user to print out, so the costs would not have to include printing.

      Cliff

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jim H. Moreno View Post
        <snip>Now, that's not to say that the genre may be barely breathing. Consider this: Who's the next John Tiller, the next person to program his digital blood, sweat and tears into the art of PC wargaming? Sure, there are Matrix Games and others, but that seems much different than a small, independent wargame developer. There are college courses taught now on how to make PC games; anyone know where you can go to learn how to make a wargame? Seems that FPS and RTS games get the most attention. Hence, I'm afraid traditional TBS wargaming may disappear if we are not careful.
        Ture but as one of the origianl lifetime subscribers to the original S&T I can say that they same thing has been siad about board wargaing for at least 35 years. Somehow the genre lives on. I can remeber playing map strategic games (real maps) then sand tabling a battle which involved a day or two setting up the sand table for the battle then may two or three days to play out. Given these were usually on the weekend it could easily take a week or six months to set up and play one battle. A given campaign could easily last a year. PC games have certainly made the process more accessable and no need for a table and hundreds of metal figures.

        I believe Jim Dunniger has a book on wargame design (board games) goes back to the glory days of S&T but then how much has it changed.
        Boston Strong!

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        • #5
          depressing article, but we will stand and fight!

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          • #6
            The Human Factor

            This was a very interesting article, well thought out. One thing the article does not stress about the syrvival of wargaming, particularing boardgames, is the human factor. Whether it is Monopoly or Panzer Leader, the essential element is human interaction, cooperation, comradrie, and shared experience. I remember playing wargames with miniatures, and the bits I remember most are my interaction with the other players.

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            • #7
              The wargame publishers that approach wargame publishing as a business are flourishing. These include companies such as GMT and Avalanche Press. They have full time staff, good customer service, and have a growing business.

              There are many, many very small hobby publishers who either don't want to grow (it is a hobby), have no full time staff, don't advertise, etc. These are the companies with less than 1,000 in sales, the DTP publishers among them.

              There is nothing wrong with these micro companies who are in it for the hobby, but please don't confuse them with the professional companies.

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