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The Joy of Handhelds

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  • The Joy of Handhelds

    In another thread, Aries wrote:
    [QUOTE]
    Originally posted by Aries View Post
    Some days my DS is all but forgotten, then some days it all I have to do. There will be times of the year it has more use than others. And it matters what your routine is too of course.

    If you commute on a train, major bonus. But not much good if you are in a car and driving.

    If the day is gawdawful hot, it might be the only thing you feel like indulging. And it can really be a sanity saver if you want to escape from it all and hide somewhere quiet with just your DS.

    Great at the cottage of course, but, if you're just killing time at home, you could as you say just use a PC or proper console.

    But occasionally, it will actually be the specific game that matters.
    I don't want to play a complicated naval sim like Harpoon. Not my thing. But I like Steel Horizon, because it's simple, uncomplicated, and there really isn't anything out there much like it.
    I just got a DS Lite last week or so. I'd been fooling around with my wife's DS Lite and took a liking to it, so I just had to get one of my own.

    At first, I had a twinge of buyer's remorse, because it hit me that I really didn't have many gaps in my day to be using the gadget. No train rides or long waits or anything.

    But now that I've been using it awhile, I find I like it anyway. I'll be sitting in my den with a full-size computer on the desk, and I'll choose to sit back in the recliner and play a DS game instead.

    Last night my wife was playing at Brain Age just before going to sleep. And she said, "There's just something nice about having all this on a little device I can hold in my hands."

    Even if one doesn't have a lot of practical reasons to use a handheld instead of a full-size console or PC, there's still an aesthetic plus to it. You know you can take it with you, for one thing. And for another thing, it's "up close and personal" -- the very fact of its being handheld makes it all yours, so to speak; you've got it "in the palm of your hand."

    I've always kinda had a preference for compact things anyhow -- small cars, transistor radios (OK, iPods, then), etc. -- so the DS suits me.

    I'm also impressed with the games designed for the DS. Some of 'em are very good and make the most of the small size and dual screens.

    Then again, the wargames are starting to all seem pretty much alike. I've been playing Age of Empires and Advance Wars DS, and I've got Steel Horizon waiting in the wings. Though the unit types and graphics and background stories differ, I'm starting to see a lot of similarity among these games. That's OK, though; it's good to have a nice blend of familiarity and variety.
    --Patrick Carroll


    "Do all you have agreed to do, and do not encroach on other persons or their property." (Richard Maybury)

  • #2
    The DS is pretty tough too.

    I bought a DS lite a few months back, and even though its the only video game system (I only play PC) I have ever bought, I love the Dang thing. I love games on it. (the touchpad is alot of fun in some games.)

    The thing that surprised me the most is how tough it is. So far mine has handled quite a few C130 flights, dampness, heat, other Marines, and a month long exercise. I bought covers for the screens, and I have a nice carrying case, but the thing handles "rough treatment" (I take care of it, but accidents happen.) very well. Dust and dirt dont bother it either, and better yet, it handles being in a seabag alright. Take care of yours, and it will last a long while.

    I love the thing because can kill time really well. Right now Im going through advance wars myself. Im going to have to pickup some your the games you guys have named off the internet though. They sound fun.

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    • #3
      I hate consoles, the games are all wrong for me. I don't want to play a sports game (even if the graphics are incredible) and I don't really like the quest games (even if the graphics are incredible). And if you don't play those there is nearly no reason to buy a console.

      But I was hassled to get a DS by a friend. I like it.
      I thought my wife would want one, but my wife doesn't appear to like technology much.

      It's not easy to judge a Hand Held.
      They are not as good at anything a PC does, nor as good at anything a real console does. Then again you can't take either your PC or your Console with you. And I think the hand held part is what's important so even a laptop is really not the same.

      But there's only so much you can accomplish with limited memory storage and a small screen so I am not going to be annoyed if the games have a slight sameness.
      So far all the titles I have gotten are pleasing. Can't play them too long though as the screen size tends to make my vision go overly focused at short range. Plus it's wise to make sure your posture is good.
      Life is change. Built models for decades.
      Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
      I didn't for a long time either.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Paul Maud'dib View Post
        I was hassled to get a DS by a friend. I like it. . . .

        But there's only so much you can accomplish with limited memory storage and a small screen so I am not going to be annoyed if the games have a slight sameness.
        Then again, there's a lot you can accomplish with the DS now that it's possible to download to it. Check out this site, for instance:
        http://ds-downloadstation.com/

        Edit: I've only glanced at this site; I don't know anything about it. So, caveat emptor.

        And there are many, many published game cartridges for it, as you can see at this site (where I was surprised by all the titles I've never seen advertised in the USA):
        http://www.mrbass.org/nintendoDS/
        Last edited by Patrick Carroll; 25 Sep 07, 17:48.
        --Patrick Carroll


        "Do all you have agreed to do, and do not encroach on other persons or their property." (Richard Maybury)

        Comment


        • #5
          One time fee of 30 bucks
          Now that's what I call leveraging the power of the internet.
          I wonder how they make it work though?
          It would seem like they are killing any need to make retail sales.
          Surely the bandwidth must be a problem even if they don't have to have physical stock.

          Thanks for those two links though.

          edit. Darn that was short lived. I told a friend about that link, and he laughed at me. I'm not normally very skeptical initially I suppose I should be.
          There might be a problem with those downloads. For one thing I was told you can't legally do that. And at closer examination you don't get to view the so called commercial free files until after you have paid the sign up fee of 29.97. That likely is done so they can get your 29.97 first before you realize what's there and not there. They seem to be conveniently vague. So I will wait until someone actually demonstrates this service is genuine.
          Last edited by LRB; 25 Sep 07, 12:31.
          Life is change. Built models for decades.
          Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
          I didn't for a long time either.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Paul Maud'dib View Post
            One time fee of 30 bucks
            Now that's what I call leveraging the power of the internet.
            I wonder how they make it work though?
            It would seem like they are killing any need to make retail sales.
            Surely the bandwidth must be a problem even if they don't have to have physical stock.

            Thanks for those two links though.

            edit. Darn that was short lived. I told a friend about that link, and he laughed at me. I'm not normally very skeptical initially I suppose I should be.
            There might be a problem with those downloads. For one thing I was told you can't legally do that. And at closer examination you don't get to view the so called commercial free files until after you have paid the sign up fee of 29.97. That likely is done so they can get your 29.97 first before you realize what's there and not there. They seem to be conveniently vague. So I will wait until someone actually demonstrates this service is genuine.
            Well, I don't know anything about that particular site, so do beware of it if you think it best.

            However, just FYI, there's lots of stuff (games, movies, music) out there on the Internet that can be legally downloaded and used on your DS. Some folks make "homebrewed" applications just for the DS and make them available to all.

            OTOH, there's also a lot of pirated stuff out there (i.e., material being distributed in violation of copyright laws) that ought not to be downloaded. So, you have to sort out the legal from the illegal.

            [Edit: My best guess is that the above site is just trying to make money by pulling a bunch of free stuff together and making it accessible to the subscriber. If you were to look around on your own, you could find everything they offer and get it at no cost at all. But if you prefer, you can pay these guys a subscriber fee and download from their site, and you thus enjoy the luxury of one-stop shopping.]

            I don't know all the ins and outs myself, but FWIW here's another link to (mostly free) homebrewed stuff for the DS:
            http://www.ndshb.com/

            Meanwhile, Nintendo is starting up a program where you can visit local DS distribution centers and download demo games onto your DS. This allows you to try a game for as long as you like before deciding to buy it.
            Last edited by Patrick Carroll; 26 Sep 07, 09:33.
            --Patrick Carroll


            "Do all you have agreed to do, and do not encroach on other persons or their property." (Richard Maybury)

            Comment


            • #7
              I have to say that the Nintendo DS has become the biggest advance in my gaming life since the advent of the home computer, some twenty-odd years ago.

              Back then, I was thrilled that at long last I could play the games I'd always wanted to play but could seldom find opponents for.

              The Internet was the next big step forward for many people, since it restored and vastly extended human-vs-human play. But I shrugged that off. It doesn't matter to me whether I'm playing against a person or a computer; often I prefer the computer, as long as it plays a reasonably good game.

              But now the DS has freed me from the desktop. I can play a game anytime, anyplace -- during a lunch break, on a camping trip, in a waiting room, or wherever. And I find I enjoy the up-close-and-personal feel of it so much that I'll use my DS at home in the evening, even when there's a desktop system nearby.

              Right now, my addiction is to Clubhouse Games -- an amazing package of traditional card and board games, with a few arcade-style games thrown into the mix. Here are many of the games I grew up with but rarely got to play back then, for lack of any other willing players. Now I can play to my heart's content and stay in practice for the once-in-a-great-while occasion when another person does want to play.

              For years I've been saying that the more computer games I play, the more I appreciate classic board and card games. These time-honored favorites are reasonably short and fast-moving, and they afford a wide variety of challenges -- from the mindless and automatic to the deep and brain-straining.

              Great little device, this DS!

              Btw, my wife just had a chance to try a Sony PSP the other day. She says she prefers her DS.
              --Patrick Carroll


              "Do all you have agreed to do, and do not encroach on other persons or their property." (Richard Maybury)

              Comment


              • #8
                I like the accesablity of the PSP
                "The people never have the power, only the illusion of it. And here is the real secret: they don't want it. The responsibility is too great to bear. It's why they are so quick to fall in line as soon as someone else takes charge."
                "

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