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Op. Narwhal - OKW - German Invasion of Britain

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  • TacCovert4
    replied
    The problem is academic. Concentration versus counterconcentration. The smaller the front is, the more divisions the Brits are able to pack into it. Which since they're on the defensive means that the Germans have to put yet more divisions on the attack, and accept the correspondingly high casualties. Stretching the Front allows the Germans to concentrate their forces at a single point and break through, rather than go on a general offensive across the whole front.

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  • craven
    replied
    What gain do the German get from extending further to West. such as does it reduce reinforcement for the Brit or increase em for the Germans. Or reduce or increase supplies. Just wonder other than VP what the benifit of having more ground is.

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  • Nick the Noodle
    replied
    Okay men we are doing okay. It would be much easier if we were all round the same table, but we aren't. Even being in the same time zone would be useful .

    May I say how great you all are doing and publically for the record .

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  • The Exorcist
    replied
    Navy notes are in the Social group

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  • Nick the Noodle
    replied
    Originally posted by The Land View Post
    The pursuit across Southern England was a success. Earlier today our Panzertruppen dislodged the "Home Guard" militia which were the only troops defending Southampton and this now forms the Western point of our advance. A hasty British line stretches from Winchester (the hex north of Southampton) to Kingston in South West London. This position makes use of a number of water obstacles, including the Rivers Wey and Blackwater and the Basingstoke Canal in addition to part of the Thames itself. Intelligence suggests that bridges in this area, as well as throughout the London metropolis, are demolished or are being prepared for demolition.

    This new line joins their prepared defensive position which is at the southern perimiter of London in the Sutton, Croydon and Orpington, with an extension east to Swanley, Dartford, Gravesend and Chatham where the meets the sea. The British appear to be using their best infantry to defend London, while the more battle-damaged divisions and their armour are concentrated in the new position. A counter-attack from London itself is a possibility; our positions in this area are a little stretched because of the need to commit infantry to the attack

    During the British retreat we succeeded in destroying one British division (48th) in its entirety, as well as a number of Home Guard formations. We must have inflicted heavy casualties on a number of other divisions.

    The main question now is where to focus out energy for future operations. Map 2 shows the supply position: the West end of our advance is currently out of supply and it would require at least a week's work on the railroads to make this a suitable jumping-off point. Alternatively we could put naval supplies through Southampton Docks, but with the railways smashed it would be difficult to project supplies more than a few hexes inland.

    The position around Guildford is rather better - here it is a matter of a day or two. However in this sector the British are better dug-in and are able to make more use of water obstacles so an attack here might be slow-going, as well as at the risk of counterattack out of London.

    The British have a number of divisions in reserve in Northern England and Scotland but there is still no sign of these units being deployed.

    Map 1: Deployment end of turn 21


    Map 2: Virtually the same but showing the supply situation at the saame stage. The blobs with numbers in represent supplied units. The maximum supply level is 50, which is experienced by units which are on an intact part of the rail network stretching back to Dover. The next best supply level of 37 belongs to units on roads or open terrain adjacent hexes of a railhead. From there, the worse the terrain and the greater the distance from the railhead, the worse the supply position.

    All this relies, of course, on being able to keep naval supply lines open..

    Thanks - will get in touch by PM with you and team once I've had a think

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  • The Land
    replied
    September 29th, 1940 - turn 21

    The pursuit across Southern England was a success. Earlier today our Panzertruppen dislodged the "Home Guard" militia which were the only troops defending Southampton and this now forms the Western point of our advance. A hasty British line stretches from Winchester (the hex north of Southampton) to Kingston in South West London. This position makes use of a number of water obstacles, including the Rivers Wey and Blackwater and the Basingstoke Canal in addition to part of the Thames itself. Intelligence suggests that bridges in this area, as well as throughout the London metropolis, are demolished or are being prepared for demolition.

    This new line joins their prepared defensive position which is at the southern perimiter of London in the Sutton, Croydon and Orpington, with an extension east to Swanley, Dartford, Gravesend and Chatham where the meets the sea. The British appear to be using their best infantry to defend London, while the more battle-damaged divisions and their armour are concentrated in the new position. A counter-attack from London itself is a possibility; our positions in this area are a little stretched because of the need to commit infantry to the attack

    During the British retreat we succeeded in destroying one British division (48th) in its entirety, as well as a number of Home Guard formations. We must have inflicted heavy casualties on a number of other divisions.

    The main question now is where to focus out energy for future operations. Map 2 shows the supply position: the West end of our advance is currently out of supply and it would require at least a week's work on the railroads to make this a suitable jumping-off point. Alternatively we could put naval supplies through Southampton Docks, but with the railways smashed it would be difficult to project supplies more than a few hexes inland.

    The position around Guildford is rather better - here it is a matter of a day or two. However in this sector the British are better dug-in and are able to make more use of water obstacles so an attack here might be slow-going, as well as at the risk of counterattack out of London.

    The British have a number of divisions in reserve in Northern England and Scotland but there is still no sign of these units being deployed.

    Map 1: Deployment end of turn 21


    Map 2: Virtually the same but showing the supply situation at the saame stage. The blobs with numbers in represent supplied units. The maximum supply level is 50, which is experienced by units which are on an intact part of the rail network stretching back to Dover. The next best supply level of 37 belongs to units on roads or open terrain adjacent hexes of a railhead. From there, the worse the terrain and the greater the distance from the railhead, the worse the supply position.

    All this relies, of course, on being able to keep naval supply lines open..

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick the Noodle
    replied
    Originally posted by The Land View Post
    She still is now ;-)

    Anyway here is a very brief update. The screenshot is half a turn out of date, the British division north of Brighton surrendered later that turn.

    Can we have the latest map please. Usual reward for doing so . They've changed the reward system, but will do so for this one as well asap .

    Leave a comment:


  • The Land
    replied
    Originally posted by Destroyer25 View Post
    Look at that! There's a nice gap at the Western end of London! We can rush in there and capture Heathrow!
    I sent a panzer battalion to investigate, turned out there was a British division in the way after all. ;-)

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  • Destroyer25
    replied
    Look at that! There's a nice gap at the Western end of London! We can rush in there and capture Heathrow!

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  • Dashy
    replied
    Bam!

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  • Nick the Noodle
    replied
    Originally posted by The Land View Post
    She still is now ;-)

    Anyway here is a very brief update. The screenshot is half a turn out of date, the British division north of Brighton surrendered later that turn.

    Awesome!

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  • craven
    replied
    Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
    Sure was a hottie back then, wasn't she?

    I always liked the pic of her working on that Jeep. Turns out she actually knew what she was doing, believe it or not.
    The one thing about the Royals it seems is for the most part most of em take what they believe is there duty seriously and seem to enjoy getting learning what they need to know and are not afraid to get dirty. hopefully that made sense.

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  • The Land
    replied
    Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
    Sure was a hottie back then, wasn't she?
    She still is now ;-)

    Anyway here is a very brief update. The screenshot is half a turn out of date, the British division north of Brighton surrendered later that turn.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Exorcist
    replied
    Sure was a hottie back then, wasn't she?

    I always liked the pic of her working on that Jeep. Turns out she actually knew what she was doing, believe it or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick the Noodle
    replied
    Originally posted by Exorcist View Post
    I was wondering about that too.
    Hopefully, we will be able to close a trap with a few Brits still inside it this time.
    Surely London is a better option on more than one level, before they dig in too much.

    I fancy this bint as me wife

    Leave a comment:

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