Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Which Course of Action should Rainbow follow?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TacCovert4
    replied
    Veterancy

    Since I know there have been some questions about how this works, and a few of you have gotten the mechanic explanation, or at least part of it, I figured I'd give the in-game explanation.

    Veterancy is defined along two parallel lines, Efficiency and Morale. I'm going do describe each level for Line Infantry, and you can draw parallels for Cavalry, Skirmishers, and Artillery respectively.

    Recruit/Green: Efficiency is low, these men wouldn't meet pre-war standards for regular army line troops. While they might load and fire three rounds in a minute on a good range day, they're averaging 1.5 at best in combat. Their skills with bayonet consist of holding it in the right direction and moving forward. Morale is also low, these men have little stamina built up and after combat or even running or a long march they won't stand in the line very long before the idea of getting out of the line of fire and resting seriously appeals to them.

    Regular: Efficiency meets the pre-war standards. They'll load and fire a bit better than 2 rounds a minute when engaged in a full-blown firefight and know the basics of bayonet fencing. They can march without wrecking their morale, and can even run into position given that it's not a terribly long dash.

    Veteran: These men have seen battle, there's no other way to get them to this point. They're a reliable force in a firefight and will load and fire three rounds a minute like clockwork. They will stand a bayonet charge and can deliver one with noticeable elan. They'll march all day and fight at the end of it, given that they don't have to run a whole lot, and they'll take morale shocks like being flanked without disintegrating.

    Crack: Think Jackson's Foot Cavalry. They've seen battle, and met the enemy up close. Many of the men have some scars from their experiences. They not only will fire at or slightly above 3 rounds a minute, they'll also aim much better while doing it, and in the pre-war Army could have given bayonet fencing demonstrations to crowds. In the morale department they'll accept any morale shock once, and can quick-march all day and then fight a battle at the end of it.

    Legendary: Long-serving troops with lots of combat experience, they've seen the elephant.....and thought it to be "jolly good sport". In efficiency they'll load and fire four rounds per minute like clockwork and have a synergy between the files to not only aim but make more shots count period. These guys are better with a knife than two recruits with bayonets and their elan shows it. In morale they can do the equivalent of running a couple of miles, firing for ten minutes, and then a two hundred yard charge, or see off twice their number in cavalry like it's another day at the office. The one downside is that while they'll practically die in place rather than be seen retreating, they are cocky enough to engage without orders if it will enhance their glorious reputations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Capt AFB
    replied
    With reinforcements, the Green Jackets are now 322-strong.

    Divided in three 105-strong companies, the new recruits were blended as much as possible with the veterans, keeping the battalion's level of experience.

    Recruits were easily identifiable in the ranks. While the veterans still wore a green jackets, green pants and green felt hats, some of them stained with blood but worn with pride, the recruits received a green jacket and continued to wear their own trousers and their own hat - Many of the recruits a bit uneasy wearing a green jacket, some stained with sweat and blood, that was formally worn by a casualty...In the ranks, each recruit was flanked by two veterans.

    Each company include a captain, a 1st Lt and a 2nd Lt. Everyone in the company were carrying a rifle. The officers, in addition to sword and revolver, also opted to carry a rifle.

    Having learn from their experience with hand-to-hand fighting, veterans - soon copied by the recruits - scoured the battlefield for "prizes" and now each carried at least one knife or an artisan made hatchet, the Bowies knife being most popular.

    Maj Bird, Capt Frumm (the new XO) and now-Lt Dyers (the new Battalion Adjutant) were the only officers on horseback and not carrying a rifle. The Sergeant-Major stayed on foot carrying rifle and a revolver (a prize he took away from a dead Yankee officer.) A young Cpl Ross, a former veterinary aid, completed the Battalion HQ and acted as messenger and medic, depending on the need at the time.

    A Quartermaster sergeant with a storeman, an old but solid-looking soldier, completed the battalion. They would be found driving the battalion supply wagon. Two civilian cooks could also be found in the back of the supply wagon, with their large cooking pots secured to the outside of the wagon.

    The 3rd cook left in the morning with the wounded returning to their home county.

    Leave a comment:


  • TacCovert4
    replied
    Originally posted by Senorankka View Post
    I will volunteer for scouting duty, we are skirmishers after all. My men are experienced and are itching for action they know they can handle.

    Also I would like to recruits 10 more men to boost my numbers to 102 without losing my experience.
    On the second, Done.

    On the first, Scouting has already been completed. The results of it have already been given to Sennef so he can do some initial planning (he has some RL issues going on). I plan to post up the Thread for Episode 3 within the next 24 hours or so, with the map, scouting report, and general situation and objectives.

    Leave a comment:


  • Senorankka
    replied
    I will volunteer for scouting duty, we are skirmishers after all. My men are experienced and are itching for action they know they can handle.

    Also I would like to recruits 10 more men to boost my numbers to 102 without losing my experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Originally posted by Cheetah772 View Post
    Happy to volunteer. Though I suspect you prefer cavalry scouting right?
    Thnx Holden. I do indeed have a slight preference for cavalry for scouting tasks and have therefore selected Dee's hussars for this mission.

    Results of Dee's scouting of terrain and enemy will be shared with you'll commanders, after which I'll present you with the plan and the orders.

    Leave a comment:


  • TacCovert4
    replied
    Ok, the units still in need of handling replacements are:

    Bird
    Finch
    Bates
    Leroy

    And I have 328 men remaining available. Of course not every man must be used.


    As soon as this is done, I'll be posting Episode 3. Map is already complete, and Sennef has been given a sneak peek to start thinking about a plan.
    Last edited by TacCovert4; 27 Jan 18, 09:33.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cheetah772
    replied
    Happy to volunteer. Though I suspect you prefer cavalry scouting right?

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Call for volunteers

    Gentlemen,

    As preparation is half of the next battle, I'll be needing volunteers for a scouting mission.
    Any takers?

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel Sennef
    replied
    Gentlemen,

    Replacement of men: I'd like you to go top up Rainbow's TO&E, not go over, unless you can make a convincing case why we should sacrifice quality to quantity.

    As for weapons: Every soldier considers his part of the trench the most important part of the front. I need to sound all your requests and give them the consideration they deserve.

    Leave a comment:


  • TacCovert4
    replied
    Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
    Okay, we talked about my guys taking on the 12 pounders, and those are Boat Howiztzers, like this-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhHTsx0p2Qg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZELtMH8LLo

    Hmm, kinds small, ain't they?
    ... but 12 pounds is 12 pounds, which gives me an idea.

    I recall seeing one of those in a reenactment, and the crew was pretty clever. with 8 men they could drag it around at a jog, no need to expose the horses to enemy fire. They were also running around the edge of the field, in rough terrain.
    Lets try the same thing here.

    I want to set up an assault artillery battery, and 3 guns will be fine for now. I have 100 men so I will need 100 of the better rifles too, I don't know what is better so I will take Enfield or Springfield depending on what is left over. 36 of the men will be taking care of the cannon and their ammo, and the rest will be riflemen working their way into range with the help of the cannon.
    With such small guns that can probably be served by men kneeling, they should be able to fight inside rifle-range too.

    I will want grape and H.E., too. We may need a lot of it.

    Will that work?
    I was hoping for months, but weeks will do. It really isn't such a radical departure, except for keeping it a combined-arms unit.
    You'll have a mule per gun for towing. There is no limber, only a field carriage. And yes men often prolonged the guns on the battlefield, I've personally done it in reenactments.

    With no limber there are wheel chests which hold iirc 8 rounds each, plus every man carries a complete round, which was the traditional setup.

    As for rifles, assume that men not involved in manning the pieces will be around in skirmish parties to protect the battery. Either rifle type works just fine and the 1855 would use Maynard primers or caps as designed. The Enfield is rapidly becoming rainbows bog standard rifle though. There are more than enough of each to go around.

    Captain Richter is afoot, not being made of money, and is assumed to carry officers sword and revolver. If you desire for him to have a long arm, just note it.

    Also your men were militia, wearing ragged homespun. Pplenty of us navy uniforms were captured, and local seamstresses assure you they can turn the blouses into shell jackets. There are both white and blue trousers and jackets, the combination is up to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    The 12 pdr howitzer fires shell, spiracle case (shrapnel), and canister. ACW field guns were rarely issued grape as it is very hard on the gun barrel and offers no advantage over the spiracle case round.
    The big trick with shell and case is getting the fuze cut accurately. You might get lucky and get some Bormann fuzes for yours if they were captured, otherwise you use wood (or less common lead or brass) time fuzes for the rounds.

    The heavy Dahlgren weighs 750 lbs. gun + carriage and packs as four loads on horses or is carried by 8 to 10 men. Assembly or disassembly takes about 5 minutes with a trained crew. Its towed by one horse in the field when assembled and can be prolonged at a trot or walk by the crew.

    Accurate range is about 750 yards give or take and maybe double that maximum. Canister can shoot to about 100 to 150 yards. Case and shell are good from about 300 yards out due to the minimum fuze time. These can still be fired as a shot without a fuze and the fuze hole plugged.
    Last edited by T. A. Gardner; 26 Jan 18, 23:34.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pruitt
    replied
    I would suggest taking the Enfields. The 1855 Springfield uses the Maynard Tape System and not caps. The Tape was prone to misfire. The Springfields should go back to an arsenal and be converted to caps. The 1861 Springfield is an 1855 converted to caps. The Richmond Arsenal produced near copies of the 1855/1861 with equipment seized at Harper's Ferry.

    Pruitt

    Leave a comment:


  • The Exorcist
    replied
    Okay, we talked about my guys taking on the 12 pounders, and those are Boat Howiztzers, like this-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhHTsx0p2Qg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZELtMH8LLo

    Hmm, kinds small, ain't they?
    ... but 12 pounds is 12 pounds, which gives me an idea.

    I recall seeing one of those in a reenactment, and the crew was pretty clever. with 8 men they could drag it around at a jog, no need to expose the horses to enemy fire. They were also running around the edge of the field, in rough terrain.
    Lets try the same thing here.

    I want to set up an assault artillery battery, and 3 guns will be fine for now. I have 100 men so I will need 100 of the better rifles too, I don't know what is better so I will take Enfield or Springfield depending on what is left over. 36 of the men will be taking care of the cannon and their ammo, and the rest will be riflemen working their way into range with the help of the cannon.
    With such small guns that can probably be served by men kneeling, they should be able to fight inside rifle-range too.

    I will want grape and H.E., too. We may need a lot of it.

    Will that work?
    I was hoping for months, but weeks will do. It really isn't such a radical departure, except for keeping it a combined-arms unit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cheetah772
    replied
    See my previous post on requesting the best of cream in replacements.

    Since I value the experience highly, I don't want to take on extra men. So that means I can only take on 15 men, because there's only 15 Whitworth rifles available. That's almost 10% of my current strength. So I should not suffer any penalty in experience loss.

    Major Holden

    Edit: The replacements should be armed with Whitworth rifles, Kerr revolvers (don't think I could get some 1860 Colt revolvers, wouldn't be enough to equip the entire company anyway), and Cutlass swords. The same equipment that my current troops are using.

    Leave a comment:


  • TacCovert4
    replied
    Well, considering that there are available men to fill every hole in Rainbow's TO&E as well as add 12 new men, I'll handle simple replacement......if you want to go above your authorized strength, talk to Sennef and get his approval.

    So, TAG, I can take you back to 40 without Sennef needing to say anything.

    And Pruitt, Done.

    Leave a comment:

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X