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Rainbow Brigade Ep. 2, March 1862

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  • #91
    Guys,

    RL is going to keep me away from this game for a while longer. Sorry for the late input.

    So here is how Maj Bird is going to fight the Green Jacket in the forest to keep the key terrain as long as possible and inflict maximum damage to the enemy while keeping his own command's combat effective.. And fight for the forest they will, as you don't give up key terrain without either holding it or covering it with your own firepower.

    During the past two days, the Green Jackets have been building waist high barricades with tree trunks to protect them from enemy fire and provide a steadying platform to rest their rifles on when firing. Abatis have been place in front and the flanks to protect from enemy infiltration.

    They have been practising moving back in the forest to a second and third defensive positions - not as built up as the first - by moving through other abatis obstacles that will impede and disorganize any pursuing enemy forces. Field of fire have been cleared as much as possible in the forest in front of the second and third position to provide minimum cover to the Yanks pursuing the Green Jackets.

    Holden has ben practising this withdrawal move with the Green Jackets, while Dee horse soldiers would move to protect their right flank.

    The Green Jackets will hold their primary position as long as possible and with protect Holden's withdrawal. Maj Bird hope that Holden's men will adopt a secondary position that will provide fire support to the Green Jackets when they are moving to their own secondary position, and so on. I don't expect Holden to hold his secondary position but to provide fire cover as the Green Jackets move to each new position.

    I would recommend that Bates' company retires using the train track to Rainbow's main defensive line. His troops will be tired from the skirmish fight and will not have practice the withdrawal plan with Bird`s and Holden's troops in the forest. I rather have my right flank secured by Dee.

    I'm not sure how effective the Tigers and Militia will be, put in the open as they will, even if they are only to fire one shot and retire. I would recommend having the Militia protect the Brit battery,at the main defensive position.

    I would recommend the Tigers be moved to the Northwest corner of the woods, facing Northeast... This way they protect Bird's and Holden's left flank as they retire through the woods, and fresher troops are available this way to help Bird, Holden and Dee as they all retire from the forest to the main position.

    I like the Britannic Battery plan for its initial position. I jut ask that the battery stay on our left flank firing at the Yanks until the last possible moment. Thanks.

    Lastly, I would find as much dry wood and other flammable material as possible and build several fire pits on the west side of the forest...With any luck and a wind blowing Easterly, I would try to burn the forest down once Bird, Holden and Dee (and the Tigers?) leave the forest in order to slow down/stop the enemy advance, use the smoke to cover our withdrawal to the main defensive line, and deny the forest use to the enemy (just an idea.)

    I'll try to come peek into the game once in a while, but RL is going to keep me busy for the next few days. Sorry that I may be missing the fight.

    Comment


    • #92
      Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
      I think everyone is 'ready'......As soon as I can I'll be working on the update.....Thank you everyone for slogging through the 'boring' part.
      Tbh - I don't find this part boring, discussing tactical options is what we're here for isn't it, now standing in line shooting at our opposite party see who runs first,

      that's boring
      Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

      Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

      Comment


      • #93
        I'm not bored either - I value the tactical discussion (although I think there can be a stage when we've developed as far as we're going to before we receive further information).

        Plus there are one or two other things I'm working on while you're setting the stage.

        The "boring bit" for Fawcett is likely to be the first couple of hours where he sits on his horse and watches the engagement unfold
        Captain Khryses, Silver Star Omnilift Wing

        Comment


        • #94
          Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
          ..I like the Britannic Battery plan for its initial position. I jut ask that the battery stay on our left flank firing at the Yanks until the last possible moment. Thanks..
          Absolutely sir! Although my fellows are a trifle uneasy about standing in the open instead of back in the cosy strongpoints where the tea and kettles are, my intention is to fire as many fusillades into the blue hordes as possible before they get within musket range.
          But bearing in mind the time it will take to limber, and the fact that my horses will be vulnerable prime targets when enemy fire begins coming in, I can't afford to dawdle too long in the front line and gift our guns to the foe.
          So as soon as their first rounds begin spattering into the dust near my guns I shall immediately limber up and pull back along the red dotted line to the most northerly strongpoint as indicated, from where I can lay down fire along the orange lines.
          The northern strongpoint is the one closest to the river, so I'll be able to effectively engage gunboats as well as anything to our front, and will also be able to lay down protective fire lanes obliquely across the face of the fort and down the full length of our line southwards.
          Yours, Tremayne (Britannic Bty)
          Last edited by Poor Old Spike; 31 Oct 17, 13:01.

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          • #95
            Alright, Editing is closed....I'll be working up the update ASAP.
            Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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            • #96
              March 18th, 0700hrs

              New Bern Map



              Dawn is breaking over Eastern North Carolina. It's a wan light from the East into the eyes of the defenders of New Bern, shaded by low hanging clouds and some occasional drizzle on this typical March day.

              With the alert, the men move to their forward positions, ready to receive Burnside's column and introduce them to the layered defense they have arranged. O'er the last couple of hours Burnside has methodically broken camp and marched the rest of his army over the shallow creek he had already secured the day before, 1st Brigade leading. Parallel to the Coast Division are ships and gunboats, sailing up the Neuse.

              First to spot the enemy are the gunners of Gardner's Battery sited inside the much improved Fort Thompson. The masts, practically vestigial onboard coastal steamers, are spotted and the gunners make ready shot and bolt. The gunners hold their fire as the ships approach, not wanting to make their strength known yet. The first shots are from the lead two vessels, Southfield and Valley City, letting fly with heavy guns and smoothbores, some shells landing on the fort but not making an appreciable dent in the soft earth glacis. For the moment, the Navy seems content to start on reducing the fort rather than going after what appear to be mere militiamen in non-uniform attire near the shoreline scrub.

              Bates men spot the enemy first and as he draws within 300yds, open up with aimed and calculated shots, causing a few casualties but forcing the lead regiments to deploy in line sooner, and make their men maneuver about in the soft ground. There is no return fire yet, the mere harassment seems to not faze the commanders of Connecticut and Massachusetts troops, and they don't bother to deploy skirmishers out front as Bates opts to withdraw rather than stand and fight against a long blue line.

              The next men to find the range are simultaneously Tremayne's Britannics and Holden's Badgers. Their new brass Field Howitzers fire at close to maximum effective range, but the experience of the gunners is evident and they land shots into the Yankees but not yet mauling them or stopping them. Holden's men are quite effective, specifically targeting officers and causing the troops to their front to slow to a halt as sergeants work to keep the line intact. The terrain has three regiments on line with two seen behind, and between their fires, the center regiment has fallen behind its flanking brothers.

              Dee's Hussars take careful aim at their own extreme range and open up on the enemy. With only a handful of men in position to do so, they score a coup as they take down the colors not once but twice and manage to shoot an officer off his horse just behind the regiment. Bates men deploy with Dee's to guard the right flank against continued attack.

              Without the long-range rifle fire killing their officers or color guards, the leftmost regiments continue to march towards Leroy and the Carolina Militia. Seeing an opportunity, Tremayne's howitzers unload into them with shell, causing some consternation but not much in the way of casualties. Their fire does draw the attention of Valley City, who lets fly with a pair of 32lb shot, which do nothing more than dig into the soft earth.

              It is at that time that the two lead ships of the fleet draw to within Gardner's preferred range, and his rifles and the big Columbiad let fly from their solid positions in the fort. The first shots skip near the Southfield but don't hole her, but with secure magazines and hardened positions the men quickly ready and fire a second salvo, this time the 65lb shell from the Columbiad barely misses striking home, and five of six bolts strike the Southfield, tearing into her bows and dismounting the 100lb Parrott located there among other damage between wind and water. The Southfield turns, bringing her 8in guns into position and managing to do nothing more than putting a smoke screen between her and the fort.

              With the continued marching, even under a devastating salvo from Tremayne, the first enemy brigades draw within range of Leroy's riflemen. The militia appear to be on the verge of breaking facing such numbers in the open, and Leroy opts to take the better part of valor, having both units fire at his Tiger's long range and after the single volley pulling back towards the Fort, his Tigers maintaining a disciplined lope to stiffen the resolve of the militia. With a parting shot into the Federals staggering the lead regiment, Tremayne's battery limbers up and withdraws as well, having no cover from either infantry or the ships in the river, and still taking ineffectual but closing fire from Valley City's heavier guns.

              Holden's Badgers keep up their steady and careful fire, ripping up the flank of the advancing regiment, taking out officers in particular. To the South, the other regiments draw within range, taking potshots from Bird behind his abatis and cover in the trees, but the real star is once again Dee's hussars, who seem to have an extreme hatred of the Stars and Stripes, and it appears that every man trying to hold that banner goes down until the flag is streaked with mud. Bates men add their fire, but at that range they're just not effective....yet.

              Gardner's battery keeps up its duel with Southfield as another ship hoves into view in the young fogbank of cannon fire. The Columbiad continues to have near misses, while three of the rifles manage to strike Southfield in her side, one damaging her paddlewheel. Return fire lands on the glacis, the 8in shell doing damage but nothing important to the earthen fort. The third ship, unidentified yet, fires, but doesn't manage to strike the fort directly. Certainly in time the accuracy of the Navy's gunners will improve as they make adjustments to their fire.

              As the hour draws to a close, the Federal regiments have not yet loosed their first volley, yet their advance has been stuttering. But they still press on, and the men of Rainbow fall back towards their defenses, not willing to suffer exchanges in the open against the Coast Division's superior numbers. Fawcett stands atop his defenses, Alternately watching the Union regiments move forward and the ships continue to appear on the river, knowing that Fort Thompson has not yet tasted the fire about to be brought down on her walls, and able to barely see another Brigade behind this one, moving into position to follow it towards his entrenchments.
              Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

              Comment


              • #97
                Major Pruitt orders his men to check their saddles and stand by to mount. "Men, I can't say how this will go down. We will probably be moving up soon. Check your loads in your Enfields. Heck, go ahead and and fire them off and reload fresh ammo. When we close, be prepared to dismount and fight on foot. I want you to aim low. Remember it takes two Yankees to carry back one wounded Yankee. You men that are drawing extra pay as Marksmen, take out the Yankee Officers and NCO's if you can. Aim for the guys riding a horse. When we close, I want officers and NCO's to dismount and fight on foot with the men. No sense in giving them a bigger target. Horseholders will be the reserve."

                Major Pruitt, Tarheel Legion Cavalry
                Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                  Dee's Hussars take careful aim at their own extreme range and open up on the enemy. With only a handful of men in position to do so, they score a coup as they take down the colors not once but twice and manage to shoot an officer off his horse just behind the regiment. Bates men deploy with Dee's to guard the right flank against continued attack.

                  ...

                  To the South, the other regiments draw within range, taking potshots from Bird behind his abatis and cover in the trees, but the real star is once again Dee's hussars, who seem to have an extreme hatred of the Stars and Stripes, and it appears that every man trying to hold that banner goes down until the flag is streaked with mud.
                  European efficiency at its finest, mixed with a businessman's ingenuity (some call it cowardice, but I call it common sense). I'll let the common man march out in a nice slow line. I paid good money for these rifles, and I plan on using them!

                  (Perhaps few of my men have a bit of a grudge against Thuringia? )

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Fawcett observes the battle unfolding with notable satisfaction.

                    So far events have unfolded much as planned; the early retreat of the Tigers and their allies being mitigated by the fierce fire he can hear from the direction of the wood. He has yet to hear the mighty crash of a regimental volley, which suggests Rainbow is using the superior range of some of her armaments to good effect. So far so good.

                    So far.

                    Seeing the Tar Heels checking their saddles and apparently it itching to get into the fight, the Colonel waves his hat at a Saddle Blazer and calls him over.

                    "Private, take the following message to Major Pruitt of the Tar Heel Legion.

                    Major,

                    Mount up and move in advance of our works while remaining in the lee of the woods. You are to hold yourself ready to intervene in the event the enemy attempts to cut off the retreat of Holden and Bird from the wood. In such instance you are to screen their northern flank and hold their line of retreat open so long as is practical. In all other cases you are to keep your men clear of combat and return to reserve once Holden and Bird reach the works.

                    Keep your men and your mounts fresh and ready for action. There will be plenty of work for them before we are done here.

                    Kind regards,

                    Col. Fawcett."
                    Captain Khryses, Silver Star Omnilift Wing

                    Comment


                    • Just came across this eye-candy pic while googling ''civil war gunboats', (As a test I'll try posting it fullsize 1200 pixels wide without a Spoiler).
                      This is the USS Morse and is especially interesting to us because it was used at New Bern 1862. It packs 2 x 9-inch (230mm) guns, dunno if this is a view of the bow or stern.
                      Presumably those angled metal (?) plates were raised in combat to protect the gunners from small arms fire?
                      Hopefully that dog survived the war..
                      Like some other civil war gunboats, it was converted from a ferryboat because their shallow draught was ideal for getting up shallow rivers.


                      WIKI- "Morse departed Hatteras Inlet with 12 other ships 12 March for Brant Island, Neuse River to cover the disembarkation of troops in the New Berne campaign."
                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Morse


                      (The Morse is also discussed at this website, apparently a member mis-identified it as the 'Perry' but they corrected him)-
                      https://civilwartalk.com/threads/gun...e-perry.76129/
                      Last edited by Poor Old Spike; 31 Oct 17, 20:25.

                      Comment


                      • Well, the gun on the left is an 8" Dahlgren smoothbore. The gun on the stern is a 6.4" 100 lbs. Parrott rifle. I can't make out the gun behind the men, but it looks a lot like an 8" model 1841 siege and garrison howitzer, but it might be a smaller field gun or howitzer too.

                        The shields that could be raised are good only against musket and rifle fire. Against a cannon, they're worthless.

                        This is the similar Commodore Barney



                        This is the Commodore Perry



                        They all have a mix of 8' Dahlgren smoothbores, 6.4" Parrott rifles, and other guns on them.

                        For example, the Perry in this picture clearly has 2 8" Dahlgren's and one 6.4" Parrott visible.



                        Any of these ships having the misfortune to take a serious hit amidships in the area of the boiler(s) is likely to detonate in a cloud of steam. That's the danger of having the boilers and engine above the waterline. They're clearly not intended to take on serious counter artillery fire as they can only bear one or two cannon on most targets and have no protection against cannon fire.

                        Just thought adding a bit of historical perspective would be enriching for everyone.
                        Last edited by T. A. Gardner; 31 Oct 17, 21:03.

                        Comment


                        • I think we are looking at the bow. There is no sign of a rudder. I don't see a Civil War warship placing their main armament in the back. Even with those shields raised the gun crew is terribly vulnerable to sharpshooters.

                          Major Pruitt, Tarheel Legion Cavalry
                          Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                          Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                          by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                            I think we are looking at the bow. There is no sign of a rudder. I don't see a Civil War warship placing their main armament in the back. Even with those shields raised the gun crew is terribly vulnerable to sharpshooters.

                            Major Pruitt, Tarheel Legion Cavalry
                            Only if the ship allows itself to get in to about 500 yards or so from the shooters. They could easily hang out at 1000 to 2000 yards with those guns they have and pound something.

                            Comment


                            • OOC:

                              A turn this phase of combat is equal to what? 1 hour or 20 mins?

                              End OOC:

                              Begin Player's Orders:

                              Holden is satisfied with his men's work as they continue to pour superior long range firepower into the fronts of enemy units from the cover of woods. He figures it's time to pull back as the enemy's flanking units begin to approach the woods from the open area north of woods. Holden doesn't want his men or his fellow brothers in arms get trapped in woods, but still wants to take potshots at the approaching enemy.

                              To that end, Holden issues the following orders:

                              1.) Inform Captain Bird that he is withdrawing in good order, so be sure to watch out on Bird's left flank.

                              2.) Send a runner to Captain Pruitt, inform him that Badgers is withdrawing to the western edge of the woods, Holden humbly requests Pruitt to cover his flanks by holding the enemy units at bay as Badgers retreats across the open space west of the woods.

                              3.) When Badgers reach the western edge of the woods, stop and get men in good order again (try not to waste time on this), have a portion of men face out north of the woods into open space. If enemy units are still marching, take shots at their officers. 1 or 2 volleys will suffice.

                              4.) As soon Pruitt covers Badgers' rear and flanks, Badgers is to march out of the woods at a brisk pace, in loose formation, don't stop to open fire, there's no need to stand in open space, easy targets for enemy units to return fire.

                              5.) Badgers is to regroup behind Finch's fortification line and send a runner to Fawcett to ask for further orders.

                              Above orders are subject to change as deadline approaches.
                              Major James Holden, Georgia Badgers Militia of Rainbow Regiment, American Civil War

                              "Aim small, miss small."

                              Comment


                              • Cpt. Leroy wishes he could've had more time with the Carolina Militia to get them to trustworthy dependability. He knows they will be a liability more than anything and he's glad he's not counting on them to line up against Union regulars. Their disorder and movement will play into the plan he made. He makes sure their Captain and Lieutenants are as well briefed as can be and he includes them in his twice daily meetings with his officers and senior NCOs. They may not be Tigers yet, but they have the opportunity to be if they survive this battle.

                                The Tigers and the Carolina militia retreat out of range and form up again. Cpt. Leroy fears that the Union may realize the feint and not focus efforts on taking the fort and outflank Rainbow in the woods. He hopes that if that happens, they can get out of those woods before that and if the Yanks catch on and try to envelope them, and if not Cpt. Leroy will order his men to assume a skirmish line and engage them with the militia held in reserve to run ammo and carry wounded back to the trenches.
                                The Europa Barbarorum II team [M2TW] needs YOUR HELP NOW HERE!

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